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All Study Hall Posts

  • Thursday, January 21, 2016
    church sound installation
    Curt Taipale 01/21/16 07:34 AM,
    This article is provided by Church Soundcheck.com.   Audio consultants often find themselves working with people in churches who seem eternally bent on saving money at any cost. This is the kind of church that will call with the seemingly innocent request to have the consultant design a new sound system for them. At some point in the conversation they’ll add that they want to do the installation themselves. That approach can be a mixed blessing both for the consultant… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEngineerInstallationSystemTechnician

  • Wednesday, January 20, 2016
    image
    M. Erik Matlock 01/20/16 11:52 AM,
    As referenced in the article “When the show hits the fan,” there was a gig we pulled off without any of our gear. That’s right. The truck never showed up. In that same article, I explained the dark art of staying calm and resolving issues without inciting panic in those who carry the check books. For this particular adventure, the job of driving hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of our precious equipment from Georgia to Texas was given to… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVConcertEngineerLoudspeakerSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, January 19, 2016
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    Jim Brown 01/19/16 03:11 PM,
    Courtesy of The Rane Library.   This article is provided by Rane as part of the Rane Library and originally appeared in the Syn-Aud-Con Newsletter, vol. 31, nos. 2 & 3, 2003 In his landmark 1994 AES paper, Neil Muncy described a common equipment design error that allows current flowing on the shields of audio wiring to enter equipment and cause audible interference. He called this design error “the Pin 1 problem,” because it was an improper connection of the… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVEngineerInterconnectSignalSystemTechnician

  • Monday, January 18, 2016
    drum miking
    Daniel Keller 01/18/16 05:04 PM,
    Courtesy of Universal Audio.   Ask 10 recording engineers about recording drums and you’re likely to get more than 20 opinions. Few instruments combine subtle nuance and brute force the way a good drummer can, and capturing that sound has been the subject of hundreds of articles and thousands of conversations. So many different aspects affect the sound of a drum mix, starting with the player. Different skins, different shells, the type of sticks, the kick-drum beater all influence the… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Friday, January 15, 2016
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    Church Sound Staff 01/15/16 10:44 AM,
    The reshaping of entertainment production wireless operations in the U.S. is currently underway, and it will impact all wireless microphone, in-ear monitoring and intercom system users – including those working in church sound – in the near future. The shrinking UHF band, where the vast majority of wireless systems currently operate, will get even smaller with the 2016 commencement of the 600 MHz incentive auction to allow the mass introduction of white space devices. Almost all of the remaining UHF… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVInstallationMicrophoneProcessorSound ReinforcementStageWireless

  • recording
    Bruce A. Miller 01/15/16 07:27 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Signal path refers to the path that sound makes while being processed. Recording signal paths include: Sound Source > Capturing Device > Wire From Capturing Device To Console Channel Input > Channel Volume, EQ, Etc. > Channel Output To Recorder Track Mixing signal paths include: Recorder Track To Console Channel Input > Channel Processing, Volume, Pan, Etc. > Channel Output To Stereo Bus > Main Stereo Output Master Fader > Final Mix In… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesInterconnectMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Thursday, January 14, 2016
    image
    Bruce Bartlett 01/14/16 04:12 PM,
    Besides sound quality, there really isn’t much to think about when it comes to microphones, right? Well, guess again! Like all elements of a sound system, mics present their own unique set of special problems. Fortunately, a lot of these problems are relatively simple to solve. It’s just a matter of identification and appropriate action. For example, most mic handles include a set-screw near the connector, with many models using this screw to ground the mic handle. If the handle… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • image
    Rob Gault 01/14/16 12:03 PM,
    What makes a moving-coil loudspeaker tick? What are some of the major variations in loudspeaker motors? As I discussed here, a wire carrying an electric current in a magnetic field will experience a force. The maximum force for a given current and magnetic field will occur when the current is flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field. In a moving coil loudspeaker, a coil of wire is immersed in an air gap in a magnetic circuit. The magnetic field is “radially”… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerSubwoofer

  • Wednesday, January 13, 2016
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    Caleb Hsu 01/13/16 11:41 AM,
    This article is provided by Sonicbids.com   The competition for landing an internship at a large-format recording facility is constantly increasing, and the expectations of assistants are higher than ever. If you want to get your foot securely in the door in a commercial recording studio, you’re expected to be technically proficient, musically skilled, aware of the current climate within the industry, and equipped with the social skills to work amidst a widely varying clientele roster. Luckily, we’ve got you… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallBusinessDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerSoftwareStudio

  • Tuesday, January 12, 2016
    loudspeakers
    PSW Staff 01/12/16 12:01 PM,
    Excerpted from JBL Professional Technical Note Volume 1, Number 14: “Basic Principles for Suspending Loudspeaker Systems.” Design Factor Design factor is a term used by the rigging industry to denote theoretical reserve capability. The rated capacity / of all lifting and hanging equipment b based upon the nominal strength of the equipment reduced by the design factor. Design factor is a number representing the fraction of equipment nominal strength chosen to be appropriate for the particular application. Rated Capacity =… View this post
    Filed in: ProductionChurch SoundFeatureSlideshowStudy HallProductionAudioRiggingStagingEducationLine ArrayLoudspeakerStageSystem



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