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All Study Hall Posts

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, May 19, 2016
    image
    M. Erik Matlock 05/19/16 11:06 AM,
    A recent conversation with another engineer got me thinking about experiences that shaped my skills. While in the trenches, certain restrictions and limitations were aggravating and occasionally provoked fits of rage. However, in hindsight, those same events were actually beneficial to developing my skills. Budget Restrictions Many, many…. many years working with churches teaches you one incredibly important skill… Making do with what you have. Part of what established me as a moderately well-respected system installer was my understanding of… View this post
    Filed in: ProductionFeatureBlogOpinionStudy HallProductionAudioAVBusinessEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • Wednesday, May 18, 2016
    image
    Dana Troxel 05/18/16 10:48 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   Editor’s Note: This article was originally published through The Rane Library in 2005, yet the information is as relevant now as it was then. Acoustic feedback (also referred to as the Larsen effect) has been roaming around sound reinforcement systems for a very long time, and everyone seems to have their own way to tame the feedback lion. Digital signal processing opened up the microphone to some creative solutions, each with its… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVDigitalInstallationInterconnectMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, May 17, 2016
    image
    Bobby Owsinski 05/17/16 05:59 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   The overdubbing stage can be something as simple as fixing or replacing some of the basic tracks (like the bass, rhythm guitar, solos, and lead vocal) or as complex as adding sophisticated layering of horns and strings, multiple guitars, keyboards, and background vocals. It’s also the phase of the project during which the most experimenting is done, since even the most meticulously designed parts sometimes don’t work and require some alteration. The… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerStudio

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    church sound
    Mike Sokol 05/16/16 06:13 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   If terms such as gain structure, impedance matching and headroom are unfamiliar, or worse, give you a headache, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most church sound techs would rather have their gear work perfectly right out of the box than have to tweak it into compliance. Nevertheless, when it comes to setting up and operating a sound system, a working knowledge of gain structure (and a few related concepts) will help you get the… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierConsolesMeasurementMixerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Wednesday, May 11, 2016
    podcasts
    Craig Leerman 05/11/16 11:33 AM,
    As audio professionals, we’re usually not concerned with how the content of podcasts and webcasts is delivered. Our focus is getting quality audio to the recorder or computer and making things sound their best. I categorize casting and streaming into two basic groups: speech gigs and musical performances. Typically, the web conferences and corporate podcasts that I work consist mainly of speech with some pre-recorded music thrown in. Music performances are a bit more complex and I’ll address how to… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogConsolesDigitalInterconnectNetworkingProcessor

  • image
    Curt Taipale 05/11/16 06:34 AM,
    This article is provided by Church Soundcheck.com.   There are many things which shouldn’t happen during a worship service, yet still do. However, unless we’re cognizant of them sometimes it’s hard to prevent them. So I decided to create a list of those things that just shouldn’t happen in a worship service. Some of these may seem so silly, so expected, so taken for granted that they’re almost not worth saying. But you’d be surprised how many times I’ve seen… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEducationEngineerMixerSignalSound ReinforcementSystemTechnician

  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Samantha Potter 05/10/16 12:14 PM,
    Finding the right day rate for freelance audio/production services isn’t easy for anyone at first. It’s a math problem that includes working with several complicated and random variables. There’s the need to ask other freelances in the area about it, doing the research, and worst (scariest?) of all, assigning a number to your worth as a professional. Let’s walk through it together. Here are some things to take into consideration before deciding a bare-minimum day rate: —What is the minimum… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEducationEngineerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • prosoundweb
    Merlijn van Veen 05/10/16 07:49 AM,
    In this article we’ll investigate how the speed of sound in air is, for all intents and purposes, exclusively temperature dependent within the audible bandwidth of our typical applications. There are some popular misconceptions on this subject related to pressure, density, and other effects that are addressed here. The speed of sound is the distance traveled per second through an elastic medium. The medium is composed of molecules held together by intermolecular forces. Sound energy passes through the medium by… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement



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