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All Study Hall Posts

  • Thursday, May 26, 2016
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    Mike Sokol 05/26/16 10:23 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   One of the most common questions that comes up on many live sound forums is how to stop noises in a sound system. I’ve been doing a lot of experimenting on this subject over the past several years, plus I’ve been battling sound system noise such as hum in the field for more than 45 years, so here’s my observations on sound system noise and what to do about it. Before having any chance… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallAVInstallationInterconnectSound ReinforcementStageSystem

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    Curt Taipale 05/26/16 05:58 AM,
    When was the last time that you listened analytically to the loudspeakers in your sanctuary and perhaps other spaces? I mean really, truly listened to them? The reason that I ask is because easily 80 percent of the church loudspeaker systems that I’m invited to evaluate and re-voice (“tune,” “EQ,” “optimize,” etc.) have something seriously wrong with them – something that the church sound techs and pastoral staff are totally unaware of. Sometimes sound techs might be suspicious that things… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallInstallationLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Wednesday, May 25, 2016
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    Nigel Redmon 05/25/16 10:12 AM,
    This article is provided by EarLevel Engineering.   Editors note: This article was originally published in 1997, but the information is still relevant today. You can read and comment on the original article here. Reverb is one of the most interesting aspects of digital signal processing effects for audio. It is a form of processing that is well-suited to digital processing, while being completely impractical with analog electronics. Because of this, digital signal processing has had a profound affect on… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVDigitalEducationProcessorSoftwareSound ReinforcementStageStudio

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    Bruce Swedien 05/25/16 06:10 AM,
    Editor’s note: If you missed the earlier discussion from Bruce, click here. Over the years, I have been very fussy about the volume levels that I use in the control room. I have always tried to observe the American OSHA sound-exposure standards. I like to test my mixes at a variety of volume levels, and on a variety of different speaker systems. This makes sure that the mix will sound good anywhere. If a mix sounds good at a low… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallProductionAudioAmplifierDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerMonitoringStudio

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
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    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, May 19, 2016
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    M. Erik Matlock 05/19/16 11:06 AM,
    A recent conversation with another engineer got me thinking about experiences that shaped my skills. While in the trenches, certain restrictions and limitations were aggravating and occasionally provoked fits of rage. However, in hindsight, those same events were actually beneficial to developing my skills. Budget Restrictions Many, many…. many years working with churches teaches you one incredibly important skill… Making do with what you have. Part of what established me as a moderately well-respected system installer was my understanding of… View this post
    Filed in: ProductionFeatureBlogOpinionStudy HallProductionAudioAVBusinessEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • Wednesday, May 18, 2016
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    Dana Troxel 05/18/16 10:48 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   Editor’s Note: This article was originally published through The Rane Library in 2005, yet the information is as relevant now as it was then. Acoustic feedback (also referred to as the Larsen effect) has been roaming around sound reinforcement systems for a very long time, and everyone seems to have their own way to tame the feedback lion. Digital signal processing opened up the microphone to some creative solutions, each with its… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVDigitalInstallationInterconnectMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, May 17, 2016
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    Bobby Owsinski 05/17/16 05:59 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   The overdubbing stage can be something as simple as fixing or replacing some of the basic tracks (like the bass, rhythm guitar, solos, and lead vocal) or as complex as adding sophisticated layering of horns and strings, multiple guitars, keyboards, and background vocals. It’s also the phase of the project during which the most experimenting is done, since even the most meticulously designed parts sometimes don’t work and require some alteration. The… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerStudio

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    church sound
    Mike Sokol 05/16/16 06:13 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   If terms such as gain structure, impedance matching and headroom are unfamiliar, or worse, give you a headache, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most church sound techs would rather have their gear work perfectly right out of the box than have to tweak it into compliance. Nevertheless, when it comes to setting up and operating a sound system, a working knowledge of gain structure (and a few related concepts) will help you get the… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierConsolesMeasurementMixerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem



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