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All Study Hall Posts

  • Friday, April 29, 2016
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    PSW Staff 04/29/16 03:21 PM,
    Editor’s Note: Here’s an interesting thread from the PSW Live Audio Board (LAB) forums. It’s lightly edited for grammar and formatting. Enjoy. Posted by Jay Last weekend I refused to let a band roadie (did the setup but didn’t mix or anything) use their own stage drops at the front of the stage. One of the drops I did approve was a Hubbell 4-plex with the low profile plastic box. One I rejected was the same but broken and held… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureForumStudy HallAVInterconnectPowerSound ReinforcementStage

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    Fred Harding & Lee Minich 04/29/16 06:03 AM,
    This article is provided by Commercial Integrator   AVB technology is another one of those great industry acronyms we all (should) know and love. It stands for Audio Video Bridging, and is technology based on IEEE 802.1 standards that have been developed by a consortium of experts in the professional audio industry. CI has asked an experience integrator, Fred Harding of distributor Capitol Sales, to define AVB and as a failsafe, Lee Minich, Marketing Work Group chair for the AVnu… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVDigitalEthernetInterconnectNetworkingSystem

  • Thursday, April 28, 2016
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    Nigel Redmon 04/28/16 12:12 PM,
    This article is provided by EarLevel Engineering.   Some terms: The Fast Fourier Transform is an algorithm optimization of the DFT—Discrete Fourier Transform. The “discrete” part just means that it’s an adaptation of the Fourier Transform, a continuous process for the analog world, to make it suitable for the sampled digital world. Most of the discussion here addresses the Fourier Transform and its adaptation to the DFT. When it’s time for you to implement the transform in a program, you’ll… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerMeasurementProcessorSignalSoftware

  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016
    dynamic processing
    PSW Staff 04/26/16 05:52 AM,
    Dynamic range can be defined as the distance between the loudest possible level to the lowest possible level. For example, if a processor states that the maximum input level before distortion is +24 dBu and the output noise floor is -92 dBu, then the processor has a total dynamic range of 24 + 92 = 116 dB. However, the average dynamic range of an orchestral performance can range from - 50 dBu to +10 dBu on average. This equates to… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, April 25, 2016
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    John Mills 04/25/16 12:45 PM,
    What Is It? A high pass filter, or HPF, is exactly as it sounds.  It is a filter we can use on our soundboards that ONLY allows the higher frequencies pass. It is sometimes referred to as a Low Cut filter for a similar reason. It is also the most overlooked tool in the sound engineer’s arsenal. Where It’s Found. Some soundboards only have a High Pass Switch which is fixed at a certain frequency, often 80Hz or 100Hz.  This… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAnalogConsolesDigitalEducationEngineerProcessorSoftwareSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, April 22, 2016
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    Scotty O'Toole 04/22/16 06:14 AM,
    Courtesy of Omega Studios.   Most folks around Omega Studios consider me to be the “analog” guy, but after all I am a working engineer in the 21st century. That means I need to know my way around those little boxes full of silicon, spinning magnetic platters and binary code. I am speaking, of course, about the modern day computer. Despite my nostalgic preferences for antiquated recording technology, I am a certified operator of, and work daily in, Pro Tools.… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalEducationEngineerSoftwareStudio

  • Thursday, April 21, 2016
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    Mike Sessler 04/21/16 12:16 PM,
    This article is provided by ChurchTechArts.   Have you heard the expression, “Stuff expands to fill the space available?” It used to be true in my life. When we lived in our first, tiny little house, we didn’t have that much stuff. In fact, it all fit in a single moving van when we bought our next, larger house. However, after 10 years there we had a lot of stuff. In fact, the once empty basement was full. It took… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • Wednesday, April 20, 2016
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    M. Erik Matlock 04/20/16 11:17 AM,
    Several times, over the course of working with my last crew, we had situations involving clients who didn’t hold up their end of the deal. It was fascinating and challenging to resolve these problems. On one festival stage, the client had followed only part of our standard agreement. The deposit was half of the fee for building a stage, sound system and lighting rig. The deal was that as soon as everything was in place and operational, the balance was… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallProductionLightingStagingAVBusinessConcertSound Reinforcement

  • loudspeakers
    Pat Brown 04/20/16 06:53 AM,
      A loudspeaker array is a collection of loudspeakers that is assembled to achieve a coverage pattern that cannot be achieved with a single device. Arrays are most commonly implemented to achieve a wide horizontal coverage pattern from a position on or above the stage. The “perfect” array would be a collection of loudspeakers whose radiation pattern was indistinguishable from a single (hypothetical) device that provided the needed pattern for the audience area. Many attempts have been made to solve… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, April 19, 2016
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    Dennis A. Bohn 04/19/16 11:47 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.  ; While selecting a power amplifier for a specific loudspeaker is often rather easy, selecting a preamp for a specific microphone is not. Terminology is the problem. At one end we find power amplifier and loudspeaker manufacturers speaking the same language, or at least using the same vocabulary. Power amps are rated in watts and ohms, while loudspeakers are rated in ohms with a maximum power handling capability stated in watts. Unfortunately, at… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementSystem



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