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All Signal Posts

  • Thursday, June 23, 2016
    image
    Chris Huff 06/23/16 06:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   Don’t we all have stories of misheard words?  It could have been a song lyric or maybe you misheard your spouse?  Maybe they mumbled a word or it just wasn’t clear what was said.  This has been the cause for a few hilarious moments at our dinner table.  The problem is that unclear words are a distraction from the message.  In the church environment, the pastor’s words must be clear and… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeaturePollStudy HallProductionAudioConsolesProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Tuesday, June 21, 2016
    dennis bohn
    Dennis A. Bohn 06/21/16 11:20 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   This paper discusses the pitfalls (often subtle) of our industry’s failure to define and standardize what “unity gain” means, and the conditions necessary to measure it. It further discusses how people improperly use one piece of misinformation (impedance matching) to correct for this lack of standardization. All done, without knowing discrepancies exist between different pieces of equipment, and without knowing impedance matching is unnecessary, signal degrading, and wasteful. For me, it began… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVInterconnectMeasurementPowerSignalSound Reinforcement

  • phantom power
    Bruce Bartlett 06/21/16 06:22 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Audio.   Unsure about phantom power? Let’s clear up the mystery. Nearly all mixing consoles and audio interfaces provide phantom power at their microphone input connectors. Most condenser mics need phantom power to operate, so you simply plug the mic into the mixer to power it. But the ways we use and connect phantom power can make a big difference in how well those mics work. So what, exactly is phantom power, and how… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesInterconnectMicrophoneMixerPowerSignal

  • Thursday, June 16, 2016
    microphones
    Ken DeLoria 06/16/16 11:18 AM,
    When it comes to microphones, there are a thousand flavors. While some manufacturers seek to advance the state of the art, others work to recreate the classic designs of the 1940s, 50s, 60s and 70s. It goes to show that new isn’t always synonymous with better. Look no further than the popularity of various plugins that model the tonality (i.e., distortion and other imperfections) of tape machines. The plugins – and even the use of actual tape machines themselves –… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallTrainingMicrophoneSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, June 02, 2016
    isemic
    Craig Leerman 06/02/16 04:05 AM,
    As an audio technician, my ears have the final say in how a system is tuned, but with the passing of time, they’re not quite as reliable as they used to be. As a result, I’m increasingly relying on measurement systems to help with dialing in the PA. I also utilize SPL apps on my phone and iPad to help monitor volume levels, and that’s worked out well. So when I first saw the iSEMic 725TR measurement microphone from iSEMcon,… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogProductAVMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, May 31, 2016
    image
    Bruce Bartlett 05/31/16 11:33 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Remote recording is exhilarating. Musicians, excited by the audience, often put on a stellar performance. Usually you only get one chance to get it recorded, and it must be done right. It’s on the edge, but by the end of the night, especially if everything has gone as planned – what a great feeling! Challenges abound. Monitors can feed back and/or leak into the vocal microphones, coloring the sound. Bass sound can… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneSignalStageWireless

  • signal levels
    Peter Janis 05/31/16 05:59 AM,
    Today’s live stage productions have become tremendously complex. All sorts of different instruments and electronic sources must be “orchestrated” along side the microphones and signals that need to be split off to a multitude of mixers to feed the house system, stage monitors, in-ear monitors, broadcast truck, Internet uplink and recording system. Paramount to the design is trying to insure some form of simplicity or standardization that will allow quick changes should disaster occur. In fact, even with today’s most… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • image
    Joe Gilder 05/24/16 06:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   You hear it all over the place. “Help! My mixes don’t translate!” In other words, “My mix sounds awesome in my studio, but then when I play it anywhere else – in my car, on my stereo, on my iPod – it sounds awful.” What’s the problem? It could be any number of things – your monitors, your room, your headphones…maybe even your recordings themselves. But let’s step away from talking… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogProductionAudioAnalogEducationEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudioSystem

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement



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