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All Signal Posts

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

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    Joe Gilder 05/24/16 06:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   You hear it all over the place. “Help! My mixes don’t translate!” In other words, “My mix sounds awesome in my studio, but then when I play it anywhere else – in my car, on my stereo, on my iPod – it sounds awful.” What’s the problem? It could be any number of things – your monitors, your room, your headphones…maybe even your recordings themselves. But let’s step away from talking… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogProductionAudioAnalogEducationEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudioSystem

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, May 18, 2016
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    Dana Troxel 05/18/16 10:48 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   Editor’s Note: This article was originally published through The Rane Library in 2005, yet the information is as relevant now as it was then. Acoustic feedback (also referred to as the Larsen effect) has been roaming around sound reinforcement systems for a very long time, and everyone seems to have their own way to tame the feedback lion. Digital signal processing opened up the microphone to some creative solutions, each with its… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVDigitalInstallationInterconnectMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    church sound
    Mike Sokol 05/16/16 06:13 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   If terms such as gain structure, impedance matching and headroom are unfamiliar, or worse, give you a headache, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most church sound techs would rather have their gear work perfectly right out of the box than have to tweak it into compliance. Nevertheless, when it comes to setting up and operating a sound system, a working knowledge of gain structure (and a few related concepts) will help you get the… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierConsolesMeasurementMixerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Thursday, May 12, 2016
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    James Cadwallader 05/12/16 06:02 AM,
    Whenever I’m at the local Guitar Hut, I like to listen to the people who come in and talk with the pro audio sales guy about gear. These conversations are often filled with nebulous audiophilic adjectives like “warm”, “sweet” and “punchy”. The sales guy has little motivation to be a source of truthful or accurate information. He just wants to make a sale. Meanwhile many of his customers already have their minds made up as to what piece of gear… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogOpinionAnalogBusinessEngineerMixerSignalSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Wednesday, May 11, 2016
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    Curt Taipale 05/11/16 06:34 AM,
    This article is provided by Church Soundcheck.com.   There are many things which shouldn’t happen during a worship service, yet still do. However, unless we’re cognizant of them sometimes it’s hard to prevent them. So I decided to create a list of those things that just shouldn’t happen in a worship service. Some of these may seem so silly, so expected, so taken for granted that they’re almost not worth saying. But you’d be surprised how many times I’ve seen… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEducationEngineerMixerSignalSound ReinforcementSystemTechnician

  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Merlijn van Veen 05/10/16 07:49 AM,
    In this article we’ll investigate how the speed of sound in air is, for all intents and purposes, exclusively temperature dependent within the audible bandwidth of our typical applications. There are some popular misconceptions on this subject related to pressure, density, and other effects that are addressed here. The speed of sound is the distance traveled per second through an elastic medium. The medium is composed of molecules held together by intermolecular forces. Sound energy passes through the medium by… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement

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    Pat Brown 05/10/16 06:42 AM,
      Crossover networks are not unique to audio and acoustics. The role of such a network is to produce a transition between two systems of differing capabilities. In a loudspeaker system, an increased overall bandwidth is achieved by splicing together two or more lower bandwidth transducer responses. An individual woofer, squawker and tweeter can form a full-range system through the use of a crossover network. Let’s look at some other systems that require similar transitions between their individual components. Several… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorSignal

  • Monday, May 09, 2016
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    Joe Gilder 05/09/16 05:30 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   Once upon a time, Joe made a stupid mistake. I was recording a bunch of acoustic guitar tracks for an album project. I was super-excited. I had set aside an entire afternoon to knock out all the songs. Also, I had just gotten a brand new microphone, and was going to use it along with another mic to record the guitar in stereo. All was right with the world. I set… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureMicrophoneSignalStudio



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