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All Measurement Posts

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    church sound
    Mike Sokol 05/16/16 06:13 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   If terms such as gain structure, impedance matching and headroom are unfamiliar, or worse, give you a headache, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most church sound techs would rather have their gear work perfectly right out of the box than have to tweak it into compliance. Nevertheless, when it comes to setting up and operating a sound system, a working knowledge of gain structure (and a few related concepts) will help you get the… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierConsolesMeasurementMixerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Friday, May 13, 2016
    image
    PSW Staff 05/13/16 09:07 AM,
    Music streaming is officially going high resolution. The industry’s official logo mark for Hi-Res MUSIC – previously applicable primarily to high-quality digital download services – will soon be available for adoption by music streaming services as well, according to an announcement today from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and its member companies Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, and Warner Music Group, in cooperation with the Recording Academy Producers & Engineers Wing, the American Association of Independent Music… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingNewsMeasurementStudio

  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Merlijn van Veen 05/10/16 07:49 AM,
    In this article we’ll investigate how the speed of sound in air is, for all intents and purposes, exclusively temperature dependent within the audible bandwidth of our typical applications. There are some popular misconceptions on this subject related to pressure, density, and other effects that are addressed here. The speed of sound is the distance traveled per second through an elastic medium. The medium is composed of molecules held together by intermolecular forces. Sound energy passes through the medium by… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement

  • image
    Pat Brown 05/10/16 06:42 AM,
      Crossover networks are not unique to audio and acoustics. The role of such a network is to produce a transition between two systems of differing capabilities. In a loudspeaker system, an increased overall bandwidth is achieved by splicing together two or more lower bandwidth transducer responses. An individual woofer, squawker and tweeter can form a full-range system through the use of a crossover network. Let’s look at some other systems that require similar transitions between their individual components. Several… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorSignal

  • Friday, May 06, 2016
    image
    Barry Rudolph 05/06/16 06:13 AM,
    Many studios built in the 1970’s were designed not to have any acoustic influence on the recorded sound produced in them. This was accomplished by over-deadening walls, floors and ceilings so no sound waves (leakage) would reflect and add (or subtract) from the instrument’s original sound waves. Bass traps were purpose-built for controlling sound from electric bass amps, small isolated (and dead sounding) drum booths were mandatory and heavy gobos or baffles were used around all musicians separating them and… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsInstallationMeasurementSignalStudioSystem

  • Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    image
    Mike Rivers 05/04/16 05:48 AM,
    This article is provided by PreSonus.   In May 2014, the VU meter celebrated its 75th birthday. It has served the industry well, and when properly interpreted, it’s still useful. However, today’s digital recording processes have caused us to take a hard look at the usefulness and inadequacy of both the traditional VU meter and its modern replacement, the LED level meter, as tools for signal-level management. The classic VU meter, though relatively rare today (primarily because of cost), has… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudio

  • Thursday, April 28, 2016
    image
    Nigel Redmon 04/28/16 12:12 PM,
    This article is provided by EarLevel Engineering.   Some terms: The Fast Fourier Transform is an algorithm optimization of the DFT—Discrete Fourier Transform. The “discrete” part just means that it’s an adaptation of the Fourier Transform, a continuous process for the analog world, to make it suitable for the sampled digital world. Most of the discussion here addresses the Fourier Transform and its adaptation to the DFT. When it’s time for you to implement the transform in a program, you’ll… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerMeasurementProcessorSignalSoftware

  • Thursday, April 21, 2016
    feedback
    Peter Mapp 04/21/16 05:43 AM,
    Editor’s Note: I ran across the following while reading through some old SynAudCon newsletters. My thanks to Peter for allowing us to share it with you here. As Pat Brown of SynAudCon noted, “These are for real - there are people out there that really believe them. This makes for good job security for all of us!” 1. Sound systems always feed back at 400 Hz. 2. Sound systems only feed back at the frequencies indicated on the graphic equalizer.… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogMeasurementProcessorSignal

  • Wednesday, April 20, 2016
    loudspeakers
    Pat Brown 04/20/16 06:53 AM,
      A loudspeaker array is a collection of loudspeakers that is assembled to achieve a coverage pattern that cannot be achieved with a single device. Arrays are most commonly implemented to achieve a wide horizontal coverage pattern from a position on or above the stage. The “perfect” array would be a collection of loudspeakers whose radiation pattern was indistinguishable from a single (hypothetical) device that provided the needed pattern for the audience area. Many attempts have been made to solve… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, April 19, 2016
    image
    PSW Staff 04/19/16 06:41 AM,
    Waves Audio (booth C2451) offers the Waves Loudness Meter Plus (WLM Plus) plugin. The next generation of the TEC Award-winning WLM Loudness Meter plugin, the WLM Plus brings new enhancements and features, new correction and adjustment tools. Ideal for content creators, post-production houses and cable head-end facilities, WLM Plus is an affordable, all-in-one cross-platform, multi-format loudness metering software solution. WLM Plus is fully compliant with all current ITU, EBU and ATSC specifications, including new, dedicated presets meeting ARIB TR-B32, OP-59… View this post
    Filed in: AVNewsProductAVDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsMeasurementMonitoringSoftware



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