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All Feature Posts

  • Friday, January 06, 2017
    church sound
    Kent Morris 01/06/17 08:06 AM,
    Are effect tools or toys? The answer is, it depends. In the hands of a seasoned operator, time-based effects deepen the sonic landscape and present a clarified image of the proceedings. However, when wielded by a careless knob-jockey, effects tend to cheapen the sound and draw attention away from the message of the song. The difference between tool and toy falls to understanding the effect’s purpose and its role within the larger scope of the song. Fortunately, the learning curve… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMixerMonitoringProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, January 05, 2017
    image
    Ken DeLoria 01/05/17 01:03 PM,
    Over the years many have debated the relative merits of “looking at screen traces” on an analyzer versus using human hearing to determine how a loudspeaker, or an entire system, actually performs. While both practices are of course valid, it’s extremely difficult for the human ear to detect, characterize, and correct small deviations in frequency and phase response, and even harder to characterize driver distortion in a meaningful manner. Likewise, the ear is often stymied when attempting to typify transient… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVDigitalLoudspeakerMeasurementSignalSystem

  • church sound
    Mike Sessler 01/05/17 08:11 AM,
    This article is provided by ChurchTechArts.   Editor’s note: This one obviously goes back a few years, but the information is worthy of repeating. Audio folks can be snobs when it comes to gear. But the reality is, we can’t always have our favorites. Sometimes, it’s a simple budget issue. At Coast Hills (my church), we didn’t have the budget for Meyer Sound, d&b audiotechnik or L-Acoustics loudspeakers. If I had held out for those brands because they have more… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessConsolesLine ArrayLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Wednesday, January 04, 2017
    al schmitt
    Bobby Owsinski 01/04/17 04:56 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   After 18 Grammys for Best Engineering (more than any other engineer) and work on over 150 gold and platinum records, Al Schmitt needs no introduction to anyone even remotely familiar with the recording industry. Indeed, his credit list is way too long to print here (but Henry Mancini, Steely Dan, George Benson, Toto, Natalie Cole, Quincy Jones, and Diana Krall are some of them), but suffice it to say that Al’s name… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneProcessorStage

  • image
    Bob McCarthy 01/04/17 07:54 AM,
    Editor’s Note: Follow the links to check out part 1, part 2, and part 3 of this series. The analyzer is at the core of a measurement system. The manufacturers of laboratory test equipment design their products to be adaptable to a wide variety of scientific applications. Their working assumption is that individual users will add the peripheral devices required for their application. The laboratory analyzer needed a lot of help to be ready for the down and dirty of… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureStudy HallAVEducationEngineerMeasurementSound ReinforcementSystemTechnician

  • Tuesday, January 03, 2017
    prosoundweb
    Kevin Young 01/03/17 01:22 PM,
    Over Michelle Sabolchick Pettinato’s 25 years as a front of house engineer, she’s worked with a wide variety of artists, among them: pop icons Christina Aguilera and Gwen Stefani, 90s rock outfits Collective Soul and Goo Goo Dolls, and currently, she’s on tour with one of her favorite bands from her teenage years, Styx. Sabolchick recalls working with a colleague, Jeff Heintz – who’s since served as a co-production manager and keyboard tech for Styx – on Stefani’s first solo… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBusinessConcertConsolesEngineerSound Reinforcement

  • prosoundweb
    Craig Leerman 01/03/17 08:03 AM,
    Of all the tools my company brings to shows, computers (in laptop form) are certainly among the most important. They allow us to edit and play back music tracks, convert audio file formats, measure/analyze audio, and evaluate/monitor the RF spectrum and coordinate frequencies for wireless systems. We can also get equipment manuals and quick start guides, surf the web during downtime and even record the gig. Whether it’s a Mac or PC doesn’t matter as long as it helps make… View this post
    Filed in: AVLive SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVMicrophoneNetworkingSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Friday, December 30, 2016
    prosoundweb
    PSW Staff 12/30/16 08:17 AM,
    PSW Top 20 presented by Renkus-Heinz   As we turn the page on 2016, we’re happy to present the 20 articles that were the most-read over this past year on ProSoundWeb. Note that some of the articles that delivered top results over the past 12 months were actually written and posted over a year ago, but they continue to prove of high interest and value to our worldwide readership. In addition, some very popular articles posted more recently have not… View this post
    Filed in: AVLive SoundRecordingChurch SoundFeatureBlogBusinessEducationSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Friday, December 23, 2016
    image
    Tom Lubin 12/23/16 10:47 AM,
    Somewhere in its early years, the coin operated record player acquired the name “jukebox.” There are several theories about the origin. The most accepted is that the word “juke” is a corruption of the word “jook,” an African American slang term for dancing. The source of the music for this dancing would have been called a “jookbox.” A second version is that “jook” meant “sex” which may have made sense since brothels were some of the first establishments to install… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogBusinessEngineerLoudspeakerRemoteStudio

  • Thursday, December 22, 2016
    line arrays
    Gary Gand 12/22/16 10:53 AM,
    Attention shoppers: the good news is that in this century, there is very little bad sound equipment. There are still plenty of bad engineers (not enough sleep and too much fun) and bad combinations of gear (70-volt clusters and powered mixers driving powered loudspeakers). But the stuff coming out of the factories - and even a lot of the proprietary (home brew) gear - is light years beyond the stuff we all got stuck with in the past. A not-so-famous… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogOpinionStudy HallBusinessEducationLine ArraySound ReinforcementSystem



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