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All Feature Posts

  • Wednesday, November 23, 2016
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    PSW Staff 11/23/16 12:35 PM,
    Editor’s Note: Here’s an interesting thread from the PSW Live Audio Board (LAB) forums. It’s lightly edited for grammar and formatting. Enjoy. Posted by Jim Does anyone have any advice or stories? Up here in Canada winter is planning its inevitable return. I’ve a few out door winter and holiday themed events booked and was making a mental prep list. With digital consoles and equipment in general, the worst symptoms of extreme cold are screen freeze and cable stiffness. The… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureStudy HallAVConcertEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • church sound
    Chris Huff 11/23/16 07:25 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   I created a frog. It wasn’t intentional. Naturally, I’m not talking about a real frog but just look at that photo to the left! You’ll never read a mixing book that says, “Make the snare’s EQ curve look like a frog in water.” If you do, immediately stop reading the book. Seriously, when it comes to snare mixing, the last place you want to be is behind the mixer. There are… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, November 22, 2016
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    Hadi Sumoro & Xian Yu 11/22/16 12:53 PM,
    This article is provided by HX Audio Lab   In the current digital world, audio analyzers with FFT or TDS functions are easily able to show the magnitude and phase response of a loudspeaker. These software analyzers are not expensive and are widely used in live sound, installation and loudspeaker development. Several popular software analyzers are ARTA, Smaart, Systune and EASERA. And there are many others. Phase response is often questioned. Many practitioners use the software functions such as: delay… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallEducationEngineerLoudspeakerMeasurementSound Reinforcement

  • image
    Peter Novak 11/22/16 08:11 AM,
    Courtesy of Omega Studios.   I’d like to expand on my last topic of sound selections in your production: the art of layering sounds so that they cut through in your mix for a more professional sound in your audio tracks. I generally approach this with the frequency content being my main focus. Does the sound or patch you’ve selected translate properly to other monitors once you take your song out of the studio? What I mean by that is,… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerProcessorStudio

  • Monday, November 21, 2016
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    Andrew Stone 11/21/16 02:11 PM,
    This article is provided by Church On The Move.   Getting to the point where I’m truly happy with an audio mix can be quite a process. Over the years a strategy of sorts has shown itself that not only helps me delete unknown variables prior to mixing but gives me a great platform to build a truly consistent mix. Once the creatives map out the set I’ll spend some time perusing the songs, either the original recordings or a… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogEngineerSound Reinforcement

  • recording
    Joe Gilder 11/21/16 08:12 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   Whether it’s a documentary on your favorite band, a movie scene in a recording studio, or a full-page ad in Sweetwater‘s latest catalog, one common theme exists: vocalists use large-diaphragm condenser microphones. I’m not a big fan of the phrase “that’s how we’ve always done it.” Certainly we should learn from the experience of others, but doing something just because everyone else does it leads to a fairly boring experience. Do… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerSignalStudio

  • Friday, November 18, 2016
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    Old Soundman 11/18/16 03:26 PM,
    Dear Old Soundman, I occasionally run sound for a band that tends to play at local hole-in-the-wall venues. O.K., we feel sorry for you, now move on! The “stage” for the band is always in one of two places: a nice boomy corner, or better yet, right in front of a brick or paneled wall. One of many problems I run into (including the lead guitarist who insists he hears better with his knees)… I know that guy! And I… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogBusinessEngineerMicrophoneMixerSound ReinforcementTechnician

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    Bobby Owsinski 11/18/16 05:58 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   As we’re all too aware, crafting a hit song isn’t easy. Most people in the music business struggle their whole careers to be a part of just one, while others do the same to get a taste of that magic once again. While there isn’t an exact formula for a hit, there are a number of common elements between them that you’ll find that may help you in creating one. Here’s an… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogEngineerStudio

  • Thursday, November 17, 2016
    church sound
    Jeff Lange 11/17/16 02:49 PM,
    The design of a new sound system for the sanctuary of The Pentecostals of the Fox Cities in Menasha, WI, was particularly challenging. This 500-seat auditorium has a 12-foot ceiling, dictating loudspeakers that are very compact in order to not detract from the room’s aesthetics. To meet this requirement, we chose premium two-way loudspeakers, with six of these cabinets flown in their horizontal cabinet position (with mid/high-frequency horns rotated), carefully placed in a distributed, decentralized arrangement. Largely due to compact… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogSlideshowStudy HallInstallationLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementStageSubwoofer

  • synaudcon
    Pat Brown 11/17/16 08:22 AM,
      Adequate signal-to-noise ratio is one of the characteristics of a professionally designed sound reinforcement system. The terms “dynamic range” and “signal-to-noise ratio” are often used interchangeably, but a closer look reveals that they are not exactly the same thing. The dynamic range of a sound system is the difference in level between the highest signal peak that can be reproduced by the system (or device in the system) and the amplitude of the highest spectral component of the noise… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementSystem



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