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All Feature Posts

  • Friday, August 26, 2016
    sound waves
    Bruce A. Miller 08/26/16 06:36 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Sound waves vibrate up and down in repeating cycles while they bounce around. Besides having positive and negative phases (when the sound is going up or going down), the cycles have physical length needed for a complete cycle back to the starting point (“wavelength”). High-frequency sounds are made from rapidly moving sound waves that can complete a cycle in a short distance, while low frequency sounds are made from slowly moving sound waves… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEducationMeasurementMicrophoneProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Thursday, August 25, 2016
    recording
    Daniel Keller 08/25/16 11:19 AM,
    Courtesy of Universal Audio.   If you’re looking for a prime example of what Toffler wrote about in Future Shock, look no further than analog tape. In little more than a decade, the two-inch multitrack tape machine has gone from studio staple to relic rarity. And while many audio veterans wax nostalgic for that warm analog sound, few will admit to missing the work that went with it. These days, owning an analog tape machine is somewhat akin to driving… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigital Audio WorkstationsMixerSignalSoftwareStudio

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    Mike Sessler 08/25/16 06:27 AM,
    This article is provided by ChurchTechArts.   Editor’s Note: Another classic piece worthy of repeating. This one originally appeared on PSW in 2010. I was reading an article a while back about normal people who use computers and the power users (AKA IT guys) that support them. The article talked about the routine problems normal people had using computers and how challenging it was for IT guys to help them. Not because the IT guys couldn’t solve the problem, but… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Wednesday, August 24, 2016
    live sound
    Craig Leerman 08/24/16 12:23 PM,
    Many of us are masters at the logistical side of loading and unloading trucks and moving gear. Correctly positioning and tuning the PA for the best coverage is almost second nature. After years of doing our jobs, we’ve become decent (or better) mixers, getting musicians to sound great in the PA. We’ve even acquired the skill of dealing with diva performers and smarmy promoters.  And when problems arise on a show like they always seem to do, our troubleshooting and… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEngineerSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

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    Bill Mueller 08/24/16 05:59 AM,
    Courtesy of Omega Studios.   What if I told you I knew a trick to save a dimpled drum head? I have been a rock music engineer for many years and in the early 1980’s found myself working with some major producers on some good bands and using typical studio procedures from the time. For a label act, the initial procedures involved a series of steps getting the drums ready to record. First, we could spend an entire day with… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerStudio

  • Tuesday, August 23, 2016
    image
    Hadi Sumoro & Xian Yu 08/23/16 11:40 AM,
    This article is provided by HX Audio Lab   Electronic correction in the form of Equalization (EQ) is one of the most useful audio tools for loudspeaker compensation/correction, whether it compensates from non-linearities in the loudspeaker or for altering the effect of room acoustics. Two audio filter types are typically used: IIR and FIR. IIR stands for Infinite Impulse Response and FIR stands for Finite Impulse Response. Each has its own pluses and minuses. This article intends to introduce key… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorTechnician

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    Chris Huff 08/23/16 06:12 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   Talking about common problems and solutions is one thing, but in this article I’m also exploring the over-arching reason why most of these occur and what you can do to avoid them. The 5 Common Audio Problems / Solutions 1. Partial plugging: I’ve even done this one back in my guitar days.  It’s what happens when the guitarist doesn’t plug their cable completely into their guitar.  When I don’t get a… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerSound ReinforcementStageSystem

  • Monday, August 22, 2016
    image
    Joe Gilder 08/22/16 11:31 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   In this edition of Home Studio Corner, Joe Gilder discusses a technique utilizing a large ribbon microphone that creates highly desirable depth in a drum session. With a Fat Head mic from Cascade Microphones, and a setup that was practically an afterthought, he discovers a way to thicken up the overall sound even within a smaller isolation room. See the video below for the step-by-step process used to develop this particular… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogVideoDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerMicrophoneStudio

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    Chris Bianchet 08/22/16 06:08 AM,
    This article is provided by Commercial Integrator   Perhaps one of the most difficult things about being a subcontractor in the AV Industry is the way we are most commonly engaged. Let me paint a picture. A salesman comes back to the installation department and says “Customer just got a budget for 3 more rooms, but they need to have them installed by next week; can we get them installed?” After the installation manager looks at the calendar to see… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVBusinessInstallationTechnician

  • Friday, August 19, 2016
    image
    Gary Parks 08/19/16 11:40 AM,
    Go to a concert these days and you’re likely to see line arrays flying left and right above the stage. For many applications, well-designed line array systems supplemented with electronic control are the best choice to provide the necessary SPL, directivity control, and uniformity of output – and to project consistent level and frequency response across large audiences. At the same time, the venerable 2-way loudspeaker, combining a cone driver with a high-frequency device through a directivity-shaping horn, has benefitted… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureProductSlideshowAVLoudspeakerManufacturerSound Reinforcement



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