Sign up for ProSoundWeb newsletters
Subscribe today!

All Feature Posts

  • Monday, May 30, 2016
    image
    Bill Mueller 05/30/16 06:42 AM,
    Courtesy of Omega Studios.   Lusting after large diaphragm condenser (LDC) microphones has become a national pastime. Newbies devour the recording magazines and read about this artist and that artist recording to vintage U-47’s or Tele 251’s and believe that they need those same mics, (or too often a design copy from China) to get a “hit” record. However, the acoustic conditions that exist in the average home studio or even small pro studio do not lend themselves to the… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureEngineerMicrophoneStudio

  • Friday, May 27, 2016
    image
    Mel Lambert and Sam Borgerson 05/27/16 12:21 PM,
    From the December 1984 issue of the late, great Recording Engineer/Producer (RE/P) magazine, Mel Lambert and Sam Borgerson interview an icon of the industry. Bob Clearmountain’s resume includes projects for Hall & Oates, Roxy Music, Huey Lewis and the News, Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen, Bryan Adams, and many more… Drawing on a rare combination of keen intuition, refined musical sensibility and patient perfectionism Bob Clearmountain has quickly advanced to one of this industry’s leading mixing engineers. In 1984 alone his… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureEngineerStudio

  • image
    Jonah Altrove 05/27/16 06:25 AM,
    I first started reading Live Sound International during high school (literally, during school), and I distinctly remember feeling frustrated by the professionals’ jargon. To that point, the sum total of my experience was “guess/test/revise” with whatever gear my school had lying around. I understood some concepts, but not the terms for them. I knew how to ring out a monitor, but I had no idea that process was called “ringing out.” I just knew it was a thing you were… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureOpinionConcertEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • Thursday, May 26, 2016
    image
    Mike Sokol 05/26/16 10:23 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   One of the most common questions that comes up on many live sound forums is how to stop noises in a sound system. I’ve been doing a lot of experimenting on this subject over the past several years, plus I’ve been battling sound system noise such as hum in the field for more than 45 years, so here’s my observations on sound system noise and what to do about it. Before having any chance… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallAVInstallationInterconnectSound ReinforcementStageSystem

  • image
    Curt Taipale 05/26/16 05:58 AM,
    When was the last time that you listened analytically to the loudspeakers in your sanctuary and perhaps other spaces? I mean really, truly listened to them? The reason that I ask is because easily 80 percent of the church loudspeaker systems that I’m invited to evaluate and re-voice (“tune,” “EQ,” “optimize,” etc.) have something seriously wrong with them – something that the church sound techs and pastoral staff are totally unaware of. Sometimes sound techs might be suspicious that things… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallInstallationLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Wednesday, May 25, 2016
    image
    Nigel Redmon 05/25/16 10:12 AM,
    This article is provided by EarLevel Engineering.   Editors note: This article was originally published in 1997, but the information is still relevant today. You can read and comment on the original article here. Reverb is one of the most interesting aspects of digital signal processing effects for audio. It is a form of processing that is well-suited to digital processing, while being completely impractical with analog electronics. Because of this, digital signal processing has had a profound affect on… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVDigitalEducationProcessorSoftwareSound ReinforcementStageStudio

  • image
    Bruce Swedien 05/25/16 06:10 AM,
    Editor’s note: If you missed the earlier discussion from Bruce, click here. Over the years, I have been very fussy about the volume levels that I use in the control room. I have always tried to observe the American OSHA sound-exposure standards. I like to test my mixes at a variety of volume levels, and on a variety of different speaker systems. This makes sure that the mix will sound good anywhere. If a mix sounds good at a low… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallProductionAudioAmplifierDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerMonitoringStudio

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • image
    Joe Gilder 05/24/16 06:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   You hear it all over the place. “Help! My mixes don’t translate!” In other words, “My mix sounds awesome in my studio, but then when I play it anywhere else – in my car, on my stereo, on my iPod – it sounds awful.” What’s the problem? It could be any number of things – your monitors, your room, your headphones…maybe even your recordings themselves. But let’s step away from talking… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogProductionAudioAnalogEducationEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudioSystem

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement



Audio Central