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  • Thursday, June 02, 2016
    isemic
    Craig Leerman 06/02/16 04:05 AM,
    As an audio technician, my ears have the final say in how a system is tuned, but with the passing of time, they’re not quite as reliable as they used to be. As a result, I’m increasingly relying on measurement systems to help with dialing in the PA. I also utilize SPL apps on my phone and iPad to help monitor volume levels, and that’s worked out well. So when I first saw the iSEMic 725TR measurement microphone from iSEMcon,… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogProductAVMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, June 01, 2016
    waves audio
    Craig Leerman 06/01/16 11:59 AM,
    A console that has a computer for a brain, rather than being limited to hard-wired analog paths, offers many advantages. Easily one of the most significant is that new features and capabilities can be easily (and at low to no cost) added via software updates. This provides much better return on investment to those who purchase the gear while also making life easier on the mix and tech side of the equation. The software-based approach also means that firmware upgrades… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogConsolesDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsMixerProcessorSoftwareSound Reinforcement

  • image
    Bobby Owsinski 06/01/16 05:55 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   When signal processing is timed to the pulse of the track, everything in the mix sounds a lot smoother. This applies to compressors, delays, modulators, and especially reverbs. One of the questions I get a lot is, “How do you time your reverb to the track?” There’s a step by step tutorial in my Audio Mixing Bootcamp book that I’ve excepted from the Adding Reverb chapter of the book below. By the… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerProcessorSoftwareStudio

  • Tuesday, May 31, 2016
    image
    Bruce Bartlett 05/31/16 11:33 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Remote recording is exhilarating. Musicians, excited by the audience, often put on a stellar performance. Usually you only get one chance to get it recorded, and it must be done right. It’s on the edge, but by the end of the night, especially if everything has gone as planned – what a great feeling! Challenges abound. Monitors can feed back and/or leak into the vocal microphones, coloring the sound. Bass sound can… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneSignalStageWireless

  • signal levels
    Peter Janis 05/31/16 05:59 AM,
    Today’s live stage productions have become tremendously complex. All sorts of different instruments and electronic sources must be “orchestrated” along side the microphones and signals that need to be split off to a multitude of mixers to feed the house system, stage monitors, in-ear monitors, broadcast truck, Internet uplink and recording system. Paramount to the design is trying to insure some form of simplicity or standardization that will allow quick changes should disaster occur. In fact, even with today’s most… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Thursday, May 26, 2016
    image
    Curt Taipale 05/26/16 05:58 AM,
    When was the last time that you listened analytically to the loudspeakers in your sanctuary and perhaps other spaces? I mean really, truly listened to them? The reason that I ask is because easily 80 percent of the church loudspeaker systems that I’m invited to evaluate and re-voice (“tune,” “EQ,” “optimize,” etc.) have something seriously wrong with them – something that the church sound techs and pastoral staff are totally unaware of. Sometimes sound techs might be suspicious that things… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallInstallationLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • image
    Joe Gilder 05/24/16 06:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   You hear it all over the place. “Help! My mixes don’t translate!” In other words, “My mix sounds awesome in my studio, but then when I play it anywhere else – in my car, on my stereo, on my iPod – it sounds awful.” What’s the problem? It could be any number of things – your monitors, your room, your headphones…maybe even your recordings themselves. But let’s step away from talking… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogProductionAudioAnalogEducationEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudioSystem

  • Monday, May 23, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Bob McCarthy 05/23/16 10:27 AM,
    Go here to read part 1 of this series.————————————————— “In the beginning there was graphic EQ.” The first standard tool for system equalization was the graphic equalizer. Early versions were 10 bands at octave intervals, but the 1/3rd-octave version took over the market completely by the late 1970s. The 31 bands were standardized to a series of 1/3rd-octave intervals beginning with 31 Hz. There was no standardization of the shape of the filters, however. One model might use 1/3 octave… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • image
    Daniel L. Newman 05/23/16 05:56 AM,
    This article is provided by Commercial Integrator   Have you ever seen or given a sales pitch that went like this:“Take a look at the proposal. If the price is too high, just let me know what will work for you and I’ll see what I can do?” Stop! You have just handed your prospective client a proposal and are already offering a price break. Why did you even bother to put a price on it? Take A Step Back… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogAVBusinessSystemTechnician



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