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  • Wednesday, July 06, 2016
    equalizers
    Dennis A. Bohn 07/06/16 11:17 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   You may have heard it said that equalizers are nothing more than glorified tone controls. That’s pretty accurate and helps explain their usefulness and importance. Simply put, equalizers allow you to change the tonal balance of whatever you are controlling. You can increase (boost) or decrease (cut) on a band-by-band basis just the desired frequencies. Equalizers come in all different sizes and shapes, varying greatly in design and complexity. Select from a… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVMeasurementProcessorSound Reinforcement

  • image
    Gary Zandstra 07/06/16 05:53 AM,
    This article is provided by Gary Zandstra.com.   Modern worship doesn’t always call for a choir, but there are still many worship services where a choir is involved.  Choirs used to be the staple of the worship experience in most churches—I grew up in a church where they were located in the “choir loft” for the whole service, singing all of the hymns with the rest of us as well as doing a special number or two themselves. This choir… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogGary Z's Church SoundStudy HallProductionAudioConsolesMicrophoneMixerProcessorStage

  • Tuesday, July 05, 2016
    image
    Bobby Owsinski 07/05/16 11:40 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   What makes a live recording sound live? The audience, of course. A live recording is all about the energy of the event, and that energy comes from the crowd, so some real thought has to be given as to how it’s captured. Just setting up some microphones haphazardly usually produces less-than-desired results. To avoid that scenario, let’s have a look at some proven mic techniques for live recording. First, it can be… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertEducationEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • image
    Andrew Stone 07/05/16 06:18 AM,
    This article is provided by Church On The Move.   Here’s the prevailing thought on my mind this weekend as I’m spending a great deal of time behind the mixing console: It’s relatively easy (simple, even!) to completely ruin your mix. This isn’t a new revelation for me or anything, just one of those simple thoughts flittering around the edge of my consciousness as I work this weekend to NOT ruin my own mix. So, fellow ruiners, allow me to… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogConcertEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • Friday, July 01, 2016
    neutrik
    Mike Sokol 07/01/16 11:05 AM,
    Cables are the bane of our existence as sound technicians. Can’t live with ‘em, and can’t live without ‘em. On many gigs I can have upwards of 100 XLR cables, which get used for everything from stage microphones and DI boxes, to sending audio to active loudspeakers for monitors, FOH, and delays. But while running XLR cables to the loudspeakers is certainly the least expensive and possibly most robust solution, many times it’s too cumbersome and creates logistical nightmares. For… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogProductReviewDigitalEthernetInterconnectLoudspeakerSignalSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Wednesday, June 29, 2016
    image
    Karl Winkler 06/29/16 06:27 AM,
    A book I recently read and reviewed for the AES Journal got me thinking about the blend of art and science we face regularly in professional audio. The book, “Audio Production and Critical Listening; Technical Ear Training” by Jason Corey (Focal Press/CRC Press), is a very comprehensive work and covers every conceivable approach to ear training for mix engineers. As with music, I believe that ear training is important in the audio world. Corey covers everything from EQ to dynamics… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertEducationEngineerSound ReinforcementStage

  • Monday, June 27, 2016
    church sound
    Kent Morris 06/27/16 11:39 AM,
    According to an old axiom, “Everyone knows two things: their job and sound.” In other words, every audience member is an audio expert. Therefore, it is difficult to deliver a “good” mix since what is proper tonal and level balance to one person is inappropriate to another. A healthy relationship between the front of house engineer and the audience rests on the engineer’s ability to provide a mix acceptable to a plurality of the listeners’ ears. To achieve success, the… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEngineerSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

  • Thursday, June 23, 2016
    image
    PSW Staff 06/23/16 10:32 AM,
    Courtesy of Acoustic Geometry.   Once upon a time, back in the big-dang vinyl-record-label era, I was one of two mixing engineers on a big-dang album project with a huge-dang artist. We had the luxury of working in a recording studio with a vinyl-disc-cutting mastering room down the hallway, so, naturally, we took advantage by having reference discs – “refs” – cut just for us. We then schlepped these one-off 33-1/3 RPM acetate LPs around to different homes and stereo… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogLoudspeakerMonitoringSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Tuesday, June 21, 2016
    dennis bohn
    Dennis A. Bohn 06/21/16 11:20 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   This paper discusses the pitfalls (often subtle) of our industry’s failure to define and standardize what “unity gain” means, and the conditions necessary to measure it. It further discusses how people improperly use one piece of misinformation (impedance matching) to correct for this lack of standardization. All done, without knowing discrepancies exist between different pieces of equipment, and without knowing impedance matching is unnecessary, signal degrading, and wasteful. For me, it began… View this post
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVInterconnectMeasurementPowerSignalSound Reinforcement

  • phantom power
    Bruce Bartlett 06/21/16 06:22 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Audio.   Unsure about phantom power? Let’s clear up the mystery. Nearly all mixing consoles and audio interfaces provide phantom power at their microphone input connectors. Most condenser mics need phantom power to operate, so you simply plug the mic into the mixer to power it. But the ways we use and connect phantom power can make a big difference in how well those mics work. So what, exactly is phantom power, and how… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesInterconnectMicrophoneMixerPowerSignal



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