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  • Tuesday, May 17, 2016
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    Bobby Owsinski 05/17/16 05:59 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   The overdubbing stage can be something as simple as fixing or replacing some of the basic tracks (like the bass, rhythm guitar, solos, and lead vocal) or as complex as adding sophisticated layering of horns and strings, multiple guitars, keyboards, and background vocals. It’s also the phase of the project during which the most experimenting is done, since even the most meticulously designed parts sometimes don’t work and require some alteration. The… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerStudio

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    church sound
    Mike Sokol 05/16/16 06:13 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   If terms such as gain structure, impedance matching and headroom are unfamiliar, or worse, give you a headache, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most church sound techs would rather have their gear work perfectly right out of the box than have to tweak it into compliance. Nevertheless, when it comes to setting up and operating a sound system, a working knowledge of gain structure (and a few related concepts) will help you get the… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierConsolesMeasurementMixerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Friday, May 13, 2016
    vue
    PSW Staff 05/13/16 10:55 AM,
    Hans Haas is passionate about many things, particularly audio, science and technology, and brewing beer. It’s a combination that led him open Wavelength Brewery last year in Vista, CA. But describing Wavelength as “just” a brewery would do it and Haas a disservice, because the venue is also becoming a hub for technology education in the Vista area. Haas’ career has taken winding path, starting in the tech world as a network engineer. “That became boring real fast,” he says.… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogBusinessEducationEngineerInstallationLine ArrayLoudspeakerSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, May 12, 2016
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    James Cadwallader 05/12/16 06:02 AM,
    Whenever I’m at the local Guitar Hut, I like to listen to the people who come in and talk with the pro audio sales guy about gear. These conversations are often filled with nebulous audiophilic adjectives like “warm”, “sweet” and “punchy”. The sales guy has little motivation to be a source of truthful or accurate information. He just wants to make a sale. Meanwhile many of his customers already have their minds made up as to what piece of gear… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogOpinionAnalogBusinessEngineerMixerSignalSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Wednesday, May 11, 2016
    podcasts
    Craig Leerman 05/11/16 11:33 AM,
    As audio professionals, we’re usually not concerned with how the content of podcasts and webcasts is delivered. Our focus is getting quality audio to the recorder or computer and making things sound their best. I categorize casting and streaming into two basic groups: speech gigs and musical performances. Typically, the web conferences and corporate podcasts that I work consist mainly of speech with some pre-recorded music thrown in. Music performances are a bit more complex and I’ll address how to… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogConsolesDigitalInterconnectNetworkingProcessor

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    Curt Taipale 05/11/16 06:34 AM,
    This article is provided by Church Soundcheck.com.   There are many things which shouldn’t happen during a worship service, yet still do. However, unless we’re cognizant of them sometimes it’s hard to prevent them. So I decided to create a list of those things that just shouldn’t happen in a worship service. Some of these may seem so silly, so expected, so taken for granted that they’re almost not worth saying. But you’d be surprised how many times I’ve seen… View this post
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEducationEngineerMixerSignalSound ReinforcementSystemTechnician

  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Samantha Potter 05/10/16 12:14 PM,
    Finding the right day rate for freelance audio/production services isn’t easy for anyone at first. It’s a math problem that includes working with several complicated and random variables. There’s the need to ask other freelances in the area about it, doing the research, and worst (scariest?) of all, assigning a number to your worth as a professional. Let’s walk through it together. Here are some things to take into consideration before deciding a bare-minimum day rate: —What is the minimum… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEducationEngineerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • prosoundweb
    Merlijn van Veen 05/10/16 07:49 AM,
    In this article we’ll investigate how the speed of sound in air is, for all intents and purposes, exclusively temperature dependent within the audible bandwidth of our typical applications. There are some popular misconceptions on this subject related to pressure, density, and other effects that are addressed here. The speed of sound is the distance traveled per second through an elastic medium. The medium is composed of molecules held together by intermolecular forces. Sound energy passes through the medium by… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, May 06, 2016
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    Teri Hogan 05/06/16 11:47 AM,
    A concert sound system is, in reality, two completely separate sound systems, joined at the hip by a split snake. Each system requires a skilled engineer, but the skill-sets between the two differ vastly. The thing that baffles me is how ill regarded the position of monitor engineer is among my brethren. It can be easily argued and defended that the monitor engineer works twice as hard as everyone else on the crew, unless he/she is lucky enough to have… View this post
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertEngineerMonitoringSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

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    Barry Rudolph 05/06/16 06:13 AM,
    Many studios built in the 1970’s were designed not to have any acoustic influence on the recorded sound produced in them. This was accomplished by over-deadening walls, floors and ceilings so no sound waves (leakage) would reflect and add (or subtract) from the instrument’s original sound waves. Bass traps were purpose-built for controlling sound from electric bass amps, small isolated (and dead sounding) drum booths were mandatory and heavy gobos or baffles were used around all musicians separating them and… View this post
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsInstallationMeasurementSignalStudioSystem



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