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Articles Tagged Techniques

  • Monday, January 23, 2017
    image
    Joe Gilder 01/23/17 04:14 PM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   When you run a blog about home recording for almost eight years, it’s easy to get away from the basics. But as any football coach or guitar teacher will tell you, fundamentals are crucial. Whether you’re new to recording and haven’t recorded a single note or you’ve recorded a thousand songs, you need the fundamentals. Today I want to expand on one of the most basic principles for recording. It’s so… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerStudio

  • Wednesday, January 18, 2017
    recording
    Robert Orban 01/18/17 08:21 AM,
    On the nights of February 16 and 17, 1971, the first commercial quad recording sessions ever were held In San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral. This monumental edifice to God’s glory and Episcopalian financial acumen is blessed with a fine pipe organ, a 90-foot ceiling, and a 7-second reverberation time. The latter, in particular, put some stringent limitations on both the recording technique and musical style involved. The session was for side 2 of Paul Beaver and Bernard Krause’s new Warner Bros.… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogMicrophoneMixerProcessorStudio

  • Monday, January 16, 2017
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    Bobby Owsinski 01/16/17 08:19 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   Knowing the proper etiquette while recording is almost as important as doing your gig. If you make people uncomfortable or do something that’s considered out of place, chances are that you won’t be asked back. Let’s look at the way everyone expects you to act during the session with these 14 tips taken from The Studio Musician’s Handbook. Most of them apply to just about everyone on a session. 1. If there’s… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogTrainingEducationEngineerStudio

  • Thursday, January 12, 2017
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    Karl Winkler 01/12/17 07:46 AM,
    Editor’s note: This goes back to 2013, but the advice is critical to this industry and worthy of repeating. The term “bedside manner” is usually associated with doctors, but I think it’s equally appropriate for any situation where customers are being served in perhaps a technical way and communication between parties is essential. Psychology matters, and should be considered in the presentation, the choice of words, and certainly the attitude of the vendor or service provider. Case in point: when… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogOpinionBusinessConcertEducationEngineerSystemTechnician

  • Wednesday, January 11, 2017
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    Bruce A. Miller 01/11/17 08:04 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Once upon a time, there was no recorded music.  To hear music you needed to go to a live performance. Eventually sheet music was printed and available to buy. If you liked the song, you bought the sheet music … if you were lucky enough to have an instrument and could play you could actually hear the song. The piano (or other musical instrument) was an important part of home entertainment. In the… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallAnalogDigitalEducationEngineerMicrophoneMixerSoftwareStudio

  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017
    subwoofers
    Craig Leerman 01/10/17 12:11 PM,
    Today’s music and special effects (like explosions in motion picture soundtracks) include a lot of low-frequency content. While larger full-range loudspeakers may have a wide frequency range, it takes subwoofers to really reproduce low end with impact, especially for bass-heavy music like electronic dance (EDM) and reggae. Deployment of main loudspeakers is usually a relatively straightforward matter, but locating and configuring subs presents numerous options and can be a bit of a challenge. Let’s start with the basics. Subwoofers are… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorSound ReinforcementSubwoofer

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    PSW Staff 01/10/17 10:02 AM,
    Audio-Technica has long been the microphone of choice for Mike Johnston, the creator of the educational website www.mikeslessons.com. Recently Johnston acquired two Audio-Technica AT5045 cardioid condenser instrument microphones, which he has been using as the exclusive microphone to achieve his “dream drum sound” for the series.  “Currently, two AT5045’s are the only mics on my kit, and people are freaking out over the sound,” he remarks. “This mic is absolutely unbelievable. I never thought I would find a mic that… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingNewsEducationEngineerMicrophoneStudio

  • Monday, January 09, 2017
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    Joe Gilder 01/09/17 08:11 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   Last time, I shared with you the first five reasons you’re not happy with your mixes. Today, let’s finish out the countdown. 5. You Don’t Have A Good Understanding Of EQ And Compression. Early on in the history of Home Studio Corner, I decided to create two in-depth courses about EQ and compression. They seemed like obvious topics to me, but I didn’t expect them to be as popular as they… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallEngineerStudio

  • Wednesday, January 04, 2017
    al schmitt
    Bobby Owsinski 01/04/17 04:56 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   After 18 Grammys for Best Engineering (more than any other engineer) and work on over 150 gold and platinum records, Al Schmitt needs no introduction to anyone even remotely familiar with the recording industry. Indeed, his credit list is way too long to print here (but Henry Mancini, Steely Dan, George Benson, Toto, Natalie Cole, Quincy Jones, and Diana Krall are some of them), but suffice it to say that Al’s name… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneProcessorStage

  • Tuesday, January 03, 2017
    prosoundweb
    Kevin Young 01/03/17 01:22 PM,
    Over Michelle Sabolchick Pettinato’s 25 years as a front of house engineer, she’s worked with a wide variety of artists, among them: pop icons Christina Aguilera and Gwen Stefani, 90s rock outfits Collective Soul and Goo Goo Dolls, and currently, she’s on tour with one of her favorite bands from her teenage years, Styx. Sabolchick recalls working with a colleague, Jeff Heintz – who’s since served as a co-production manager and keyboard tech for Styx – on Stefani’s first solo… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBusinessConcertConsolesEngineerSound Reinforcement



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