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Articles Tagged Sound Reinforcement Techniques

  • Friday, January 13, 2017
    prosoundweb
    Mike Sokol 01/13/17 06:34 AM,
    Many live mixes are not only too loud, but also sonically unbalanced. I got to thinking about this (again) when recently re-reading “How Loud Does It Need To Be?” by Peter Janis of Radial Engineering here on ProSoundWeb. Yes, I’m saying it right here: far too many live mixes are just plain bad. That is, too much bass, too many highs, and dynamics out of control. Add this to SPL in excess of 110 to 115 dB and it’s not… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMeasurementMixerSignalSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017
    microphones
    Jonah Altrove 01/10/17 08:05 AM,
    My father used to say, “Son, opinions are like drum miking techniques. Everyone has one.” Or something like that… Truthfully, there’s an overwhelming amount of information already out there on this topic, so rather than rehash it here, let’s explore a less conventional approach. I’ll admit that it’s a unique method, as it’s a hybrid of studio techniques and some ideas “begged, borrowed and stolen” from engineers I admire. Picture a snare drum. Let’s mike the top and bottom heads.… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundChurch SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Tuesday, January 03, 2017
    prosoundweb
    Craig Leerman 01/03/17 08:03 AM,
    Of all the tools my company brings to shows, computers (in laptop form) are certainly among the most important. They allow us to edit and play back music tracks, convert audio file formats, measure/analyze audio, and evaluate/monitor the RF spectrum and coordinate frequencies for wireless systems. We can also get equipment manuals and quick start guides, surf the web during downtime and even record the gig. Whether it’s a Mac or PC doesn’t matter as long as it helps make… View this story
    Filed in: AVLive SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVMicrophoneNetworkingSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Tuesday, November 29, 2016
    image
    Merlijn van Veen 11/29/16 12:49 PM,
    Many believe that condenser microphones are more sensitive than dynamic microphones (moving coil) and therefore pick up “everything,” e.g., stage wash and noise. Sensitivity, however, is nothing but a constant conversion rate from pressure to voltage and more important, it is distance independent. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not the reason for picking up “everything.” Most condenser mics are indeed more sensitive. A Neumann KMS 105 condenser with a sensitivity spec of 4.5 millivolts at 1 Pascal (4.5 mV/Pa) is… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureVideoStudy HallMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSound Reinforcement



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