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Articles Tagged Rob Schlette

  • Tuesday, November 26, 2013
    recording
    Rob Schlette 11/26/13 04:25 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   An audio pass filter attenuates an entire range of frequencies. There are two types of pass filters (Figure 1, below). A high-pass filter (HPF) attenuates content below a cutoff frequency, allowing higher frequencies to pass through the filter. A low-pass filter (LPF) attenuates content above a cutoff frequency, allowing lower frequencies to pass through the filter. The slope of filter attenuation is usually quantified in decibels per octave. For example,… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsProcessorSignalSoftwareStudio

  • Friday, November 15, 2013
    image
    Rob Schlette 11/15/13 02:29 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   There was a lot of consumer and pro audio press about the introduction of the Mastered for iTunes program, but there are still a lot of music creators and producers who aren’t aware of the program’s details, advantages, or implications. This article explains the Mastered for iTunes program, and why it’s an important benchmark for digital music in general. Masters vs Premasters Like nearly every other digital music distribution channel,… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMeasurementSignalStudio

  • Friday, July 05, 2013
    recording
    Rob Schlette 07/05/13 10:02 AM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   There are a lot of different ways to conceptualize ‘tone’ when we begin to think about a contemporary recording project. Some of them are powerful, and some of them are pointless. This article points out a few useful techniques for addressing tone during mixing, with mastering in mind. 1. Tone As An Organizational Tool There are a lot of great articles on this site and others that point out how… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsProcessorStudio

  • Monday, June 03, 2013
    recording
    Rob Schlette 06/03/13 09:39 AM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   What Is A Backup? A backup is a working safety copy of your production data. The goal of a systematic approach to backups is to keep data loss from stopping or significantly delaying your work. If properly implemented, a backup system will contain current production data for all in-progress projects as of the conclusion of the most recent session. As many readers know very well, the importance of data backup… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsEthernetNetworkingStudio

  • Wednesday, January 16, 2013
    recording
    Rob Schlette 01/16/13 05:49 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   There are a lot of different ways to conceptualize ‘dynamics’ when we begin to think about a contemporary recording project. Some of them are powerful, and some of them are pointless. This article points out a few useful techniques for addressing dynamics during mixing, with mastering in mind. Let’s start by considering dynamics at the largest most ‘zoomed out’ level. The fundamental question is whether it is musically appropriate for… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMixerStudio

  • Wednesday, October 10, 2012
    recording
    Rob Schlette 10/10/12 02:04 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   Archiving may well be the least glamorous or exciting thing that has ever happened in a recording studio. That said, none of the fun parts of music production have much point if the recordings they produce can’t be played back over time. Understanding and practicing systematic archival basics is a necessity, whether you’re in it for the art, or to make a living (or some combination of the two). Archiving… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogBusinessDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsStudio

  • Thursday, August 16, 2012
    studio recording
    Rob Schlette 08/16/12 02:14 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   The question of how to charge for professional audio services can be a confusing one. The decision only becomes more weighty when we take into account the confusion that prospective clients can feel when they compare engineers or studios that have seemingly incompatible price structures. It’s important to provide our clients with the clearest, most accurate estimate of costs that we can, so let’s look at some of the advantages… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallBusinessEngineerStudioAudio

  • Thursday, June 28, 2012
    recording
    Rob Schlette 06/28/12 02:21 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   The topic of audio perception has been pretty hot lately. From the popular news media coverage of Mastered for iTunes to the pages of TapeOp magazine, it’s not uncommon for people to be asking the question, “can you really hear the difference?” This is very good news for music and music lovers. That might not seem like an extraordinary question for people to be asking, but the elastic reach of… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureSignalStudioAudio

  • Tuesday, June 05, 2012
    recording
    Rob Schlette 06/05/12 10:05 AM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   The world may not revolve around guitar music anymore, but there is still a lot of it out there. Whether you’re working on face melting hardcore or a gentle country ballad, the presentation of the guitar content in the mix has a lot to do with the overall stylistic impression of the song. Here are a few tried and true techniques for working with guitar tracks: 1. Hear the Arrangement… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsMixerProcessorStudio

  • Thursday, March 15, 2012
    recording
    Rob Schlette 03/15/12 03:48 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   Vocal sibilance is an unpleasant tonal harshness that can happen during consonant syllables (like S, T, and Z), caused by disproportionate audio dynamics in upper midrange frequencies. Sibilance is often centered between 5 kHz to 8 kHz, but can occur well above that frequency range. This problem is usually caused by the actual vocal formant, but can also be exaggerated by microphone placement and technique. This article will discuss some… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeaturePollDigital Audio WorkstationsMixerProcessorStudio