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Articles Tagged Microphone World

  • Tuesday, June 21, 2016
    phantom power
    Bruce Bartlett 06/21/16 06:22 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Audio.   Unsure about phantom power? Let’s clear up the mystery. Nearly all mixing consoles and audio interfaces provide phantom power at their microphone input connectors. Most condenser mics need phantom power to operate, so you simply plug the mic into the mixer to power it. But the ways we use and connect phantom power can make a big difference in how well those mics work. So what, exactly is phantom power, and how… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesInterconnectMicrophoneMixerPowerSignal

  • Thursday, June 16, 2016
    microphones
    Ken DeLoria 06/16/16 11:18 AM,
    When it comes to microphones, there are a thousand flavors. While some manufacturers seek to advance the state of the art, others work to recreate the classic designs of the 1940s, 50s, 60s and 70s. It goes to show that new isn’t always synonymous with better. Look no further than the popularity of various plugins that model the tonality (i.e., distortion and other imperfections) of tape machines. The plugins – and even the use of actual tape machines themselves –… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallTrainingMicrophoneSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, May 31, 2016
    image
    Bruce Bartlett 05/31/16 11:33 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Remote recording is exhilarating. Musicians, excited by the audience, often put on a stellar performance. Usually you only get one chance to get it recorded, and it must be done right. It’s on the edge, but by the end of the night, especially if everything has gone as planned – what a great feeling! Challenges abound. Monitors can feed back and/or leak into the vocal microphones, coloring the sound. Bass sound can… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneSignalStageWireless

  • Monday, May 30, 2016
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    Bill Mueller 05/30/16 06:42 AM,
    Courtesy of Omega Studios.   Lusting after large diaphragm condenser (LDC) microphones has become a national pastime. Newbies devour the recording magazines and read about this artist and that artist recording to vintage U-47’s or Tele 251’s and believe that they need those same mics, (or too often a design copy from China) to get a “hit” record. However, the acoustic conditions that exist in the average home studio or even small pro studio do not lend themselves to the… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureEngineerMicrophoneStudio

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Mark Frink 05/24/16 11:09 AM,
    The input list and stage plot is the audio core of any technical rider and the road map for organizing stage equipment and console inputs. Accurate advance information allows risers and backline to be placed, microphones and wedges cabled, and even a line check when the touring crew’s travel is delayed. Working for clubs, festivals or sound companies, we’re often frustrated by inaccurate paperwork reflecting a version of a band that’s months or years old. The reason for out-of-date paperwork… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    luke bryan
    Greg DeTogne 05/16/16 11:09 AM,
    No matter how much dust Luke Bryan’s current Kill the Lights Tour kicks up, the party and the good times just keep rolling. With seemingly no venue deemed off-limits on his schedule, the two-time CMA and ACM Entertainer of the Year is on the road with a backdrop of dates recently played or soon to come at festivals, in arenas, sheds, stadiums, fieldhouses, and even the wide open spaces of farm fields, where his annual Farm Tour returns him to… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureConcertEngineerLine ArrayMicrophoneSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    shure microphone world
    Tim Vear 05/04/16 12:12 PM,
    Lavalier Microphones The desired sound source for a lavalier microphone is a speaking (or occasionally singing) voice. Undesired sources include other speaking voices, clothing or movement noise, ambient sound, and loudspeakers. Balanced low-impedance output is preferred as usual. Adequate sensitivity can be achieved by both dynamic and condenser types, due to the relatively close placement of the microphone. However, a condenser is generally preferred. The physical design is optimized for body-worn use. This may be done by means of a… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 04/26/16 12:34 PM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Nothing has more effect on the sound of your recordings than microphone technique. For example, which mic you choose—and where you place it—affect the recorded tone quality. That is, mic technique affects how much bass, midrange, and treble you hear in the monitored sound of a musical instrument. Mic choice and placement also affect how distant the instrument sounds in the recording, and how much background noise you pick up. This guide… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureProductionAudioMicrophoneSignalStudioSystem

  • Tuesday, April 12, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 04/12/16 06:40 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Some time ago I decided I wanted to find out how the location of a microphone near a banjo affects the tone quality you hear. To make these tests scientific as well as subjective, I measured the spectrum of the banjo in several different mic locations. The spectrum of a musical instrument is its output vs. frequency. It affects the tonal balance or timbre. It is the relative levels of the fundamental… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Wednesday, April 06, 2016
    microphones
    Joe Shambro 04/06/16 04:29 PM,
    In the world of live sound, certain topics are guaranteed to draw fellow engineers into a multi-hour discussion that ends in no agreement and a hefty bar tab. Drum miking is at (or near) the top of the list. Further, every situation is different. Sometimes it’s best to just go with a pair of overheads and a kick mic, while at the other end of the spectrum, sometimes the situation calls for individual spot mics for all 48 inputs on… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement



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