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Articles Tagged Microphone World

  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017
    microphones
    Jonah Altrove 01/10/17 08:05 AM,
    My father used to say, “Son, opinions are like drum miking techniques. Everyone has one.” Or something like that… Truthfully, there’s an overwhelming amount of information already out there on this topic, so rather than rehash it here, let’s explore a less conventional approach. I’ll admit that it’s a unique method, as it’s a hybrid of studio techniques and some ideas “begged, borrowed and stolen” from engineers I admire. Picture a snare drum. Let’s mike the top and bottom heads.… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundChurch SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Monday, January 09, 2017
    wireless systems
    Ike Zimbel 01/09/17 11:42 AM,
    For many in pro audio, working with wireless systems is still thought to be a “nightmare” filled with peril, an accident waiting to happen, and so on. In actual fact, wireless systems are meant to work and in fact do work every day in thousands of concerts, theatrical productions, festivals, churches, broadcasts and the like, all around the world. With that in mind, I’ve compiled this list of troubleshooting steps to take when encountering wireless problems in the field. Hopefully… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneMonitoringSignalSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Wednesday, January 04, 2017
    al schmitt
    Bobby Owsinski 01/04/17 04:56 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   After 18 Grammys for Best Engineering (more than any other engineer) and work on over 150 gold and platinum records, Al Schmitt needs no introduction to anyone even remotely familiar with the recording industry. Indeed, his credit list is way too long to print here (but Henry Mancini, Steely Dan, George Benson, Toto, Natalie Cole, Quincy Jones, and Diana Krall are some of them), but suffice it to say that Al’s name… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneProcessorStage

  • Wednesday, December 21, 2016
    image
    Bruce A. Miller 12/21/16 07:39 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Once upon a time I was doing the typical thing of going with what I was told worked or what I watched the engineers I had assisted do.  Specifically, I was recording piano with a pair of matching microphones in an XY pattern around the hammers. I knew about many approaches (another mic at the far end of the piano and then pan that mic over to the bass side of the stereo… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Thursday, December 08, 2016
    guitar mic techniques
    Barry Rudolph 12/08/16 08:18 AM,
    Because of its fundamental importance in popular music, the electric guitar is the subject of intense scrutiny and wide differences of opinions. Just what makes a good guitar sound? Compared to all the subtle and not so subtle sounds that come out of an electric guitar amp, fidelity judgments of vocal sounds are easy to make! With good knowledge of the different guitar and amplifier sonic capabilities, coupled with good microphone techniques,we can achieve the ultimate guitar sound that “fits”… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMicrophoneProcessorSignalStudio

  • Tuesday, November 29, 2016
    image
    Merlijn van Veen 11/29/16 12:49 PM,
    Many believe that condenser microphones are more sensitive than dynamic microphones (moving coil) and therefore pick up “everything,” e.g., stage wash and noise. Sensitivity, however, is nothing but a constant conversion rate from pressure to voltage and more important, it is distance independent. Contrary to popular belief, it’s not the reason for picking up “everything.” Most condenser mics are indeed more sensitive. A Neumann KMS 105 condenser with a sensitivity spec of 4.5 millivolts at 1 Pascal (4.5 mV/Pa) is… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureVideoStudy HallMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, November 23, 2016
    church sound
    Chris Huff 11/23/16 07:25 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   I created a frog. It wasn’t intentional. Naturally, I’m not talking about a real frog but just look at that photo to the left! You’ll never read a mixing book that says, “Make the snare’s EQ curve look like a frog in water.” If you do, immediately stop reading the book. Seriously, when it comes to snare mixing, the last place you want to be is behind the mixer. There are… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, November 21, 2016
    recording
    Joe Gilder 11/21/16 08:12 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   Whether it’s a documentary on your favorite band, a movie scene in a recording studio, or a full-page ad in Sweetwater‘s latest catalog, one common theme exists: vocalists use large-diaphragm condenser microphones. I’m not a big fan of the phrase “that’s how we’ve always done it.” Certainly we should learn from the experience of others, but doing something just because everyone else does it leads to a fairly boring experience. Do… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerSignalStudio

  • Tuesday, November 15, 2016
    rolling stones
    Bruce Borgerson 11/15/16 07:30 AM,
    If you’ve seen the Rolling Stones Gimme Shelter movie, you might recall Jimmy Johnson’s brief speaking role. He was the one coaching Keith Richards on the proper Alabama pronunciation of “Y’all come back, y’hear.” For three nights in December of 1969, the Stones cut basic tracks and live vocals for three songs: “You Gotta Move,” “Wild Horses” and “Brown Sugar.” The sessions took place at Muscle Shoals Sound Studios—the “burlap palace” at 3614 Jackson Highway—a nondescript former casket factory which… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorStudioTechnician

  • Friday, October 28, 2016
    microphones
    Bruce Bartlett 10/28/16 06:46 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Audio.   Getting a little bored with the same old “tried-and-true” microphones and techniques? Let’s have some fun with fresh approaches that are off the beaten path. Vocals To create a differential (noise-canceling) mic, tape two identical omni mics together, one over the other, separated by a block of wood (Figure 1). Mix both mics at equal levels but with one mic switched in opposite polarity. Have the performer sing close to the top… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageStudio



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