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Articles Tagged Microphone World

  • Monday, June 22, 2015
    Bobby Owsinski 06/22/15 05:32 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   By my count, there are 8 “constants” that we find in vocal recording. These are items or situations that almost always prove to be true. Just keeping them in mind can save you a lot of trouble in the search for a sound that works for you and your vocalist. Here are a few tips taken from The Recording Engineer’s Handbook and The Music Producer’s Handbook to help you get a great… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSignalStudio

  • Wednesday, June 17, 2015
    Bruce A. Miller 06/17/15 04:53 AM,
    This article is provided by   Often, a young engineer will start to position microphones based on what they see done by others or read in a magazine. Sometimes they experiment and move the mics to see if the sound improves, but usually once someone ends up with a mic setup they like they stop trying to improve it. There are certain standard approaches that have been successful, but even these approaches should never be considered “etched in stone.”… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEducationEngineerMicrophoneSignalStudio

  • Friday, June 12, 2015
    Bruce Bartlett 06/12/15 11:30 AM,
    The live sound world goes well beyond the concert realm into areas such as the performing arts, including theatrical plays, musicals, and opera. It also can extend to things like magic shows, dance troupes, puppet shows, jugglers, and even ventriloquists. Each act presents special microphone requirements, which we’ll explore here. Performing arts applications usually involve at least one of four types: floor mics, hanging mics, wireless lavalier mics, and wireless headworn mics. On The Floor Stage floor microphones, also known… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallLoudspeakerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Thursday, June 04, 2015
    Craig Leerman 06/04/15 08:30 AM,
    Many of us spend a lot of time obsessing about the sound of kick drums and guitar amps. We audition different microphones with the lead vocalist during sound check, then spend tons of time getting the mic and effects dialed in for the show. But unfortunately, when it comes to background vocals (BGV), we’re too often content to simply put go-to ball mics on stands, roll off everything under 100 Hz, EQ out anything that starts to squeal, and move… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertInterconnectLoudspeakerMicrophoneMonitoringProcessorSound ReinforcementStage

  • Thursday, May 28, 2015
    Bruce Bartlett 05/28/15 10:50 AM,
    Suppose you’re going to mike a singer, a sax, or a guitar. Which mic should you choose? Where should you place it? Your mic technique has a powerful effect on the sound of your recordings. In this article we’ll look at some general principles of miking that apply to all instruments. Which Mic Should I Use? Is there a “right” mic to use on a piano, a kick drum, or a guitar amp? No. Every microphone sounds different, and you… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallProductionAudioMicrophoneSignalStudioSystem

  • Friday, May 22, 2015
    James Cadwallader 05/22/15 08:02 AM,
    Everyone agrees with the idea that you point the microphone at what you want it to pick up. But there’s another side to the coin: pointing the mic away from what you don’t want. This perspective applies both for using a particular polar pattern to eliminate undesired pickup or miking unconventionally to find a desired sound. Take drum miking. Snare bleed in the hi-hat mic can blur the snare in the mix, especially for those drummers who know how to… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Thursday, May 07, 2015
    wireless systems
    Craig Leerman 05/07/15 09:22 AM,
    Wireless systems are a key component in almost every facet of live entertainment production, especially concerts and corporate meetings and events. The demand continues to increase as the supply of available bandwidth is both shrinking and becoming more congested. As a result, pre-planning and wireless frequency coordination are becoming more important, particularly as the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) is preparing to sell off more of the UHF spectrum where the majority of wireless microphones and monitoring systems operate (currently 470-698… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Monday, April 20, 2015
    Craig Leerman 04/20/15 03:10 PM,
    Microphones come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, but many of us typically categorize them in two basic groups: vocals and instruments. And the truth is that many models can excel at either task. Take the ubiquitous Shure SM57. It’s a “go-to” instrument mic found in almost every live and studio mic kit yet it also handles vocals and speech quite well. Ever see the podium for the president of the United States? It’s long incorporated a pair… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureSlideshowMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Friday, April 10, 2015
    Bruce A. Miller 04/10/15 02:12 PM,
    This article is provided by   Once upon a time I was doing the typical thing of going with what I was told worked or what I watched the engineers I had assisted do.  Specifically, I was recording piano with a pair of matching microphones in an XY pattern around the hammers. I knew about many approaches (another mic at the far end of the piano and then pan that mic over to the bass side of the stereo… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Monday, March 30, 2015
    Bruce Bartlett 03/30/15 07:58 AM,
    Perhaps the most exciting type of recording comes in the live realm, whether it be in a club or concert hall or stadium. Many musicians and bands want to record live because they feel that’s when they play best. The goal, then, is to capture the performance so it can be brought back alive. Remote recording is exhilarating. The musicians - excited by the audience - often put on a stellar performance. Usually you only get one chance to get… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage