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Articles Tagged Instruments

  • Wednesday, January 18, 2017
    radial engineering
    PSW Staff 01/18/17 07:42 AM,
    Radial Engineering has introduced Key-Largo, which combines a keyboard mixer, computer interface and foot pedal in a single unit. It’s on display at this week’s NAMM show in Anaheim at Booth 6940 in Hall A. The design includes three stereo input channels for analog synths. Each channel is equipped with a level control and an effects send. A fourth input for a USB connects to a laptop to play back audio files and mix them with the live keys. A… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundRecordingNewsProductInterconnectMixerProcessorSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017
    microphones
    Jonah Altrove 01/10/17 08:05 AM,
    My father used to say, “Son, opinions are like drum miking techniques. Everyone has one.” Or something like that… Truthfully, there’s an overwhelming amount of information already out there on this topic, so rather than rehash it here, let’s explore a less conventional approach. I’ll admit that it’s a unique method, as it’s a hybrid of studio techniques and some ideas “begged, borrowed and stolen” from engineers I admire. Picture a snare drum. Let’s mike the top and bottom heads.… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundChurch SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Wednesday, January 04, 2017
    al schmitt
    Bobby Owsinski 01/04/17 04:56 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   After 18 Grammys for Best Engineering (more than any other engineer) and work on over 150 gold and platinum records, Al Schmitt needs no introduction to anyone even remotely familiar with the recording industry. Indeed, his credit list is way too long to print here (but Henry Mancini, Steely Dan, George Benson, Toto, Natalie Cole, Quincy Jones, and Diana Krall are some of them), but suffice it to say that Al’s name… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneProcessorStage

  • Wednesday, December 21, 2016
    image
    Bruce A. Miller 12/21/16 07:39 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Once upon a time I was doing the typical thing of going with what I was told worked or what I watched the engineers I had assisted do.  Specifically, I was recording piano with a pair of matching microphones in an XY pattern around the hammers. I knew about many approaches (another mic at the far end of the piano and then pan that mic over to the bass side of the stereo… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Thursday, December 08, 2016
    guitar mic techniques
    Barry Rudolph 12/08/16 08:18 AM,
    Because of its fundamental importance in popular music, the electric guitar is the subject of intense scrutiny and wide differences of opinions. Just what makes a good guitar sound? Compared to all the subtle and not so subtle sounds that come out of an electric guitar amp, fidelity judgments of vocal sounds are easy to make! With good knowledge of the different guitar and amplifier sonic capabilities, coupled with good microphone techniques,we can achieve the ultimate guitar sound that “fits”… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMicrophoneProcessorSignalStudio

  • Wednesday, December 07, 2016
    church sound
    Kent Morris 12/07/16 12:47 PM,
    Denominational and theological differences between churches are as weak as sewing thread in comparison to the divisive question of drums in a worship service. Where some congregations see a method of regulating tempo and establishing new musical styles, others envision a source of noise and an infiltration of secular values. Should churches incorporate percussion instruments into their musical compositions? If so, how should appropriate use be determined, and by whom? Is an acoustic drum set superior to an electronic one?… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalMeasurementMicrophoneMonitoringProcessorSound ReinforcementStage

  • Wednesday, November 23, 2016
    church sound
    Chris Huff 11/23/16 07:25 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   I created a frog. It wasn’t intentional. Naturally, I’m not talking about a real frog but just look at that photo to the left! You’ll never read a mixing book that says, “Make the snare’s EQ curve look like a frog in water.” If you do, immediately stop reading the book. Seriously, when it comes to snare mixing, the last place you want to be is behind the mixer. There are… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, October 28, 2016
    microphones
    Bruce Bartlett 10/28/16 06:46 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Audio.   Getting a little bored with the same old “tried-and-true” microphones and techniques? Let’s have some fun with fresh approaches that are off the beaten path. Vocals To create a differential (noise-canceling) mic, tape two identical omni mics together, one over the other, separated by a block of wood (Figure 1). Mix both mics at equal levels but with one mic switched in opposite polarity. Have the performer sing close to the top… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageStudio

  • Wednesday, October 12, 2016
    mic techniques
    Teri Hogan 10/12/16 07:03 AM,
    Living in South Central Texas, we operate in a very diverse ethnic atmosphere and encounter every description of strange and unusual instrument. Over time, we (and our engineers) have discovered some techniques that work well for some of these applications. There may be other, possibly better ways to accomplish the task. But the following represent tried and true methods that work for us, as well as the musicians we support. Accordion. What do you call 100 accordions in the Rio… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConcertMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Thursday, September 29, 2016
    image
    PSW Staff 09/29/16 02:39 PM,
    Audio-Technica (booth 503) is displaying its new ATM350a microphone systems. Offering clear, well-balanced response even in very high SPL applications, the ATM350a cardioid condenser instrument microphone comes in six specially designed systems that provide discreet mounting solutions for a host of instruments, including woodwinds, strings, brass, percussion, drums and piano. Following in the footsteps of the ATM350, the ATM350a is capable of handling 159 dB max SPL, a 10 dB increase over its predecessor. This allows the mic to cope… View this story
    Filed in: AVNewsProductAVManufacturerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageStudio



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