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Articles Tagged Church Sound

  • Friday, July 22, 2016
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    Gary Zandstra 07/22/16 05:56 AM,
    This article is provided by Gary Zandstra.com.   In the eyes of some people, I “cheat” when mixing.  This cheating usually takes place when I’m working with a band and/or singers that I don’t know that well. One of the common things that we face in church production today is “the worship team” - usually four to five singers that vocally lead the service or presentation. Too many times to count, I’ve found myself mixing and not knowing a single… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureConsolesEngineerMixer

  • Thursday, July 21, 2016
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    Mike Sessler 07/21/16 06:03 AM,
    This article is provided by ChurchTechArts.   A few years ago, Tim Cool from Visioneering posted a thought-provoking post of the same name (The Cost Of Getting It Wrong). It’s very good, and I suggest you go read the whole thing. He asks several questions related to staffing, building and designing. As I thought about what he wrote, one particular question resonated with me: What will it cost to have the wrong audio and acoustics in your worship center? Again,… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogBusinessEducationSystem

  • Wednesday, July 20, 2016
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    PSW Staff 07/20/16 06:29 AM,
    Located in the heart of Seoul, South Korea’s Dongshin Presbyterian Church recently installed Allen & Heath’s dLive digital mixing system as part of the Church’s developing digital based A/V system. Dongshin Church celebrated its 60th anniversary this year, and the building was named as a ‘Seoul Legacy for the Future’ by the city in 2014. Comprising a S5000 control surface and a DM48 MixRack, the new system replaces the incumbent GL3800 analog mixer. “The relationship between A&H and Dongshin Church… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundNewsConsolesDigitalInstallationSound Reinforcement

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    Curt Taipale 07/20/16 06:20 AM,
    This article is provided by Church Soundcheck.com.   This question is exceedingly simple to answer, yet easily eighty percent of churches choose the wrong answer. The reality is that most churches try to place the house mixing desk (console) in a location that hides the equipment as much as possible. Their solution is driven by aesthetics, mostly because that is what they understand. My guess is that they haven’t asked their sound team volunteers, the ones who will be actually… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVConsolesInstallationSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, July 19, 2016
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    PSW Staff 07/19/16 08:04 AM,
    New Stanton United Methodist Church offers a variety of ministries designed to ‘speak’ to worshippers of all ages and quality sound plays a vital role. To ensure that all members of the congregation would be able to hear clearly in their brand new sanctuary, the church recently invested in new sound reinforcement loudspeakers from WorxAudio Technologies, a division of PreSonus Audio Electronics. Good Sounds of New Stanton, PA, was contracted to design and deploy the new SR system at New… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundNewsInstallationLine ArrayLoudspeakerSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, July 18, 2016
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    PSW Staff 07/18/16 12:25 PM,
    One of the most commonly asked questions in audio is “What microphone can I use that doesn’t cause feedback?” The answer: no such microphone exists. Feedback results from a combination of many factors, including loudspeaker placement, microphone placement, and the frequency response of both devices and room acoustics. It’s a complicated process. Entire books have been written on the subject and the mathematical formulas that model feedback are quite involved. So let’s summarize the problem. What is it? Feedback is… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallMicrophoneMonitoringProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, July 15, 2016
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    PSW Staff 07/15/16 10:39 AM,
    Flatirons Church, located in Boulder, Colorado, recently invested in new Eastern Acoustic Works (EAW) Redline loudspeakers to accommodate the growing needs of their church. They required a solution for the times when attendance to the church exceeds seating in the sanctuary – often by as many as 1,000 worshippers. By deploying Redline in the lobby, everyone in attendance has the same worship experience. It also provides them with a system to use for outside events, which are a common occurrence… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundNewsLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementSubwoofer

  • professional audio
    Karl Winkler 07/15/16 05:43 AM,
    When I was getting stated in this business, I had some excellent mentors along the way. One of the things they taught me was to be prepared with a set of tools and the knowledge to use them properly. While organizing the U.S. Air Force Band Sound Workshop (an annual event for military sound engineers) during the 1990s, I passed along this information to the budding audio people, many of whom were musicians transitioning to sound for a variety of… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEducationEngineerMeasurementSound ReinforcementSubwooferTechnician

  • Wednesday, July 13, 2016
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    Mike Sokol & Hector La Torre 07/13/16 06:09 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   DI boxes (“Direct Instrument” or “Direct Inject” boxes) are very helpful tools in a live sound system. The most common type is called a passive DI, which includes an isolation transformer and ground lift switch.  The primary function of a DI box is to convert the unbalanced (1/4-inch 2-conductor) phone plug output on your keyboard or guitar into a low-impedance (low-z), balanced (3-conductor) XLR jack, which can be plugged directly into your signal snake… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogEducationInterconnectMonitoringPowerSignalSound ReinforcementStage

  • Tuesday, July 12, 2016
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    PSW Staff 07/12/16 12:18 PM,
    Christian Assembly Church in Los Angeles, CA, first began as a small prayer group of Italians during the Azusa Street Revival Movement in the early 1900s. Since its establishment, the church has grown considerably over the years, with close to 3,000 worshipers attending services each week. The current church was built in 1976, and by 2010, was due for a major renovation project, including a completely new suite of wireless systems and microphones. For the audio overhaul, Dirk Bolle, IT/Tech… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundNewsMicrophoneSound ReinforcementWireless



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