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Articles Tagged Chuck Mcgregor

  • Friday, November 28, 2014
    pro audio
    Chuck McGregor 11/28/14 02:18 PM,
    It seems nothing is ever easy. However simple they might appear, making fixed resistive attenuators (I’ll call them pads in this article) requires doing some math if you want them to come out right. Sure, you could simply hook up some resistors and see what you get, but that’s not audio engineering. The reasons for doing the math are simple: to make both the pad and the equipment you are using with the pad work properly. You will see why… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVInterconnectMeasurementPowerProcessorSignal

  • Tuesday, October 07, 2014
    prosoundweb
    Chuck McGregor 10/07/14 10:31 AM,
    This is a practical guide to doing dB (decibel) calculations, covering most common audio situations. You see dB numbers all the time in audio. You may understand that 3 dB is considered a just noticeable change in volume level. But, you haven’t a clue how to figure out how to figure out what 24 dB from your mixing console means to your amplifier rated for 1.4V input sensitivity. You may be aware that dB calculations involve “logs” (logarithms). Thanks to… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, January 31, 2014
    loudspeakers
    Chuck McGregor 01/31/14 03:41 PM,
    What Damping Does: The main effect of damping in a loudspeaker is to reduce the SPL produced by the loudspeaker’s diaphragm moving because of its own inertia after the signal stops. The frequency of the sound it produces with this movement will be at the resonant frequency of the moving system. A common term for this is “overhang,” and in severe cases, this can translate into “one note bass.” Types Of Loudspeaker Damping: There are two types of loudspeaker damping:… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, December 18, 2013
    phase polarity
    Chuck McGregor 12/18/13 03:35 PM,
    Polarity and Phase - these terms are often used as if they mean the same thing. They are not. POLARITY: In electricity this is a simple reversal of the plus and minus voltage. It doesn’t matter whether it is DC or AC voltage. For DC, Turn a battery around in a flashlight and you have inverted or, more commonly stated, reversed the polarity of the voltage going to the light bulb. For AC, interchange the two wires at the input… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVEducationInstallationMeasurementProcessorSignalTechnician

  • Thursday, June 06, 2013
    gain structure
    Chuck McGregor 06/06/13 05:01 PM,
    Realistically, audio signals at or near the noise floor of a system are not useful because the signal will not be significantly louder than the noise. Therefore, some minimum usable level must be assumed below which the electronic noise is considered objectionable. A signal to noise ratio of 20 dB is considered minimally acceptable for good intelligibility. For a high quality system 30 dB would be a better figure to use. Using this value, the range from this minimum signal… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVConsolesEducationMixerProcessorSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Tuesday, February 05, 2013
    image
    Chuck McGregor 02/05/13 10:05 AM,
    Polarity and Phase - two terms are often used as if they mean the same thing. They are not. POLARITY: In electricity this is a simple reversal of the plus and minus voltage. It doesn’t matter whether it is DC or AC voltage. For DC, Turn a battery around in a flashlight and you have inverted or, more commonly stated, reversed the polarity of the voltage going to the light bulb. For AC, interchange the two wires at the input… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeaturePollStudy HallProductionAudioAVEducationLoudspeakerSignal

  • Wednesday, October 31, 2012
    amplifier world
    Chuck McGregor 10/31/12 11:22 AM,
    Clipping means that the tops of the signal are “clipped off” or “flat-topped” when the signal level is exceeding the maximum capability of the power amplifier or some other piece of equipment in the system. During the times when a signal is flat-topped, loudspeaker cones are not being “instructed” to move as it is receiving essentially a DC signal. This means all power goes into heating up their voice coils instead of producing sound. In other words, during the times… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeaturePollStudy HallAmplifierAVPower

  • Monday, July 16, 2012
    image
    Chuck McGregor 07/16/12 01:34 PM,
    This is a practical guide to doing audio calculations, particularly dB (decibel) calculations, covering most common situations. You see dB numbers all the time in audio, and probably understand that 3 dB is considered a just noticeable change in volume level. You may also be aware that dB calculations involve “logs” (logarithms). But perhaps you’re not quite so clear on how to figure out what 24 dB from your mixing console means to your amplifier rated for 1.4V input sensitivity.… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVEducationLoudspeakerProcessorSound ReinforcementAudio