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Articles Tagged Bruce Bartlett

  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 04/26/16 12:34 PM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Nothing has more effect on the sound of your recordings than microphone technique. For example, which mic you choose—and where you place it—affect the recorded tone quality. That is, mic technique affects how much bass, midrange, and treble you hear in the monitored sound of a musical instrument. Mic choice and placement also affect how distant the instrument sounds in the recording, and how much background noise you pick up. This guide… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureProductionAudioMicrophoneSignalStudioSystem

  • Tuesday, April 12, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 04/12/16 06:40 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Some time ago I decided I wanted to find out how the location of a microphone near a banjo affects the tone quality you hear. To make these tests scientific as well as subjective, I measured the spectrum of the banjo in several different mic locations. The spectrum of a musical instrument is its output vs. frequency. It affects the tonal balance or timbre. It is the relative levels of the fundamental… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Friday, March 18, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 03/18/16 06:05 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   What goes around comes around. From the 1920s through the 1940s, PA systems for music often used only a single microphone. Band members would gather closely around this mic, balancing their sound by moving toward or away from the mic. Radio broadcasts and recordings often used one mic as well. This “old fashioned” technique has made a comeback; for example, many bluegrass and folk bands utilize the one-mic method with surprisingly good… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureProductionAudioEducationMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Monday, February 29, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 02/29/16 06:57 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   What microphone is best for recording an orchestra? What’s a good snare mic? Should the mic be a condenser or dynamic, omni or cardioid? You can answer these questions more easily once you know the types of microphones and understand their specs. First, it always pays to get a high-quality microphone. The mic is a source of your recorded signal. If that signal is noisy, distorted, or tonally colored, you’ll be stuck… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureProductStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Thursday, January 14, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 01/14/16 04:12 PM,
    Besides sound quality, there really isn’t much to think about when it comes to microphones, right? Well, guess again! Like all elements of a sound system, mics present their own unique set of special problems. Fortunately, a lot of these problems are relatively simple to solve. It’s just a matter of identification and appropriate action. For example, most mic handles include a set-screw near the connector, with many models using this screw to ground the mic handle. If the handle… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Tuesday, January 12, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 01/12/16 04:49 PM,
    Headworn and bodyworn microphones serve many valuable roles in live sound reinforcement. The two most common are headset/earset and lavalier designs, both allowing performers/presenters to roam freely around the stage/platform, hands free, with impressive sound quality and good gain-before-feedback. Nearly all are condenser designs; some are wired and some are wireless. The headset/earset category is defined by light weight and comfort. Earsets have a mount that wraps around one ear, while headsets further stability by using an adjustable band that… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureProductAVManufacturerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageWireless

  • Friday, October 23, 2015
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    Bruce Bartlett 10/23/15 06:01 AM,
    Let’s face it - the live sound reinforcement realm presents some microphone challenges that regularly threaten sound quality. Look at the conditions. The monitors feed back. They leak into the vocal microphones and color the sound. The bass sound leaks into the drum mics, and the drums leak into the piano microphones. And then there are the other mic-related gremlins - breath pops, lighting buzzes, wireless-mic glitches, and even electric shocks. So let’s have a look at solving at least… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureStudy HallTrainingEducationEngineerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Thursday, October 08, 2015
    prosoundweb
    PSW Staff 10/08/15 05:29 AM,
    ProSoundWeb presents at least two feature articles every day of the working week, meaning that there are 40-plus long-form articles highlighted each and every month. That’s a lot. In fact, so much so that we got to thinking that it would be handy to present a round-up of the most-read articles for those who might have missed at least some of them the first time around. Here we kick off with the top 5 most-read articles on PSW for the… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureAVDigitalEducationEngineerLoudspeakerMicrophoneProcessorSound ReinforcementStageStudioTechnicianWireless

  • Thursday, August 27, 2015
    microphone techniques
    Bruce Bartlett 08/27/15 06:41 AM,
    Suppose you’re reinforcing a singer/guitarist in mono, with one microphone on the singer and another mic on the acoustic guitar. The vocal sounds funny - sort of hollow or filtered. What’s happening? Both microphones are picking up the singer, with the mic for the guitar about one foot farther from the singer’s voice than the mic for the vocals (Figure 1, below). So there are two vocal signals in the mix – one is direct and the other is delayed.… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallProductionAudioAnalogEducationEngineerMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Thursday, June 25, 2015
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    Bruce Bartlett 06/25/15 07:18 AM,
    Take a breath of fresh air on a country morning. That’s the sensation you get from a well-amplified acoustic ensemble. Guitar, upright bass, mandolin, dulcimer, banjo – all produce a sweet, airy sound that can be captured with the right approach. Acoustic music heard over a sound reinforcement system is all about beauty and naturalness, not hype. Listen to a number of well-recorded CDs of old-time country, bluegrass and acoustic jazz. In most cases you’ll hear no effects except some… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage



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