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Articles Tagged Audio Basics

  • Friday, March 04, 2016
    wireless systems
    Ike Zimbel 03/04/16 10:06 AM,
    So, you’ve done your scan, frequency coordination, antenna placement, walk-around and war-gaming tests, and everything works. All of your wireless transmitters are resting comfortably in their metal trays, the batteries are good and line check has verified that all of your units are sending audio where they’re supposed to. What else can go wrong? Well, for one, a presenter or performer can end up with the wrong transmitter in his/her hand at a critical moment. Wireless microphones, being, well, wireless,… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMeasurementMicrophoneSignalSoftwareSound ReinforcementWireless

  • Thursday, March 03, 2016
    live sound international
    Karl Winkler 03/03/16 11:25 AM,
    I’ll start by saying that “elitism” is something that I’m as guilty of as many working in pro audio. While blind A/B/X testing is a great tool, I think there’s also something to be said for at least some of the esoteric claims made by audiophiles. The basis of my reasoning: when we spend a lot of time with particular audio devices (or fine wines or superbly crafted musical instruments), our perception changes. Our threshold shifts either up or down,… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogOpinionStudy HallBusinessDigitalInterconnectMeasurementSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Wednesday, March 02, 2016
    live sound
    Jonah Altrove 03/02/16 11:24 AM,
    As sound engineers, we’re tasked with shaping the sound of the artist’s performance. When we’re running our consoles, we’re literally “putting together the pieces” of a song into the product that the audience hears. I’ve found that gaining an understanding of how a song “works” – how different sounds play different roles in the arrangement – help my chances of relating the song to the audience in a way that’s enjoyable and engaging. An awareness of how different instrumental parts… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMixerProcessorSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, February 29, 2016
    image
    Bruce Bartlett 02/29/16 06:57 AM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   What microphone is best for recording an orchestra? What’s a good snare mic? Should the mic be a condenser or dynamic, omni or cardioid? You can answer these questions more easily once you know the types of microphones and understand their specs. First, it always pays to get a high-quality microphone. The mic is a source of your recorded signal. If that signal is noisy, distorted, or tonally colored, you’ll be stuck… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureProductStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Friday, February 26, 2016
    image
    Chris Huff 02/26/16 07:17 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   One Friday night, I used three pairs of ears. I’m not talking about earbuds or anything electronic in nature. I’m talking about real human-tissue ears.  And therein was the key to my success. A friend of mine was a singer in a 30-plus-person barbershop singing group. He told me they could use an experienced sound guy and asked if I was interested.  A few phone calls and emails later, I found… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallEngineerMixerSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, February 22, 2016
    image
    John Mills 02/22/16 03:09 PM,
    When I first began doing sound, I bought a great set of headphones. I thought to myself—if I’m going to be expected to make something sound good, I should probably know what I’m shooting for. So I started listening (like crazy) to CDs. Not just bands or styles I liked, but anything and everything I could get my hands on. I listened to the lyrics, chords, melodies and harmonies, but also to how it all fit together. I concentrated on… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesMixerProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Friday, February 19, 2016
    image
    Pat Brown 02/19/16 11:37 AM,
      For professional audio people, the word “power” usually conjures up visions of racks of amplifiers are used to drive the loudspeakers in a sound system. But the amplifier and other system components must have a stable power source from which to operate.  Thus the issue of power distribution, all the way from Hoover Dam to your sound system, is vital. Some of the principles of audio signal distribution in sound systems are borrowed directly from utility companies, and so… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVMeasurementPowerSignal

  • Tuesday, February 16, 2016
    audio power
    Mike Sokol 02/16/16 11:59 AM,
    I’ve been a professional audio engineer for 40-plus years and a musician for 10 years more than that, and during that time, I’ve witnessed hundreds of shock events on performance stages, recording studios, and even factory floors. A survey I ran on ProSoundWeb a few years ago revealed that 70 percent of the 3,000 musicians who responded had been shocked at least once on stage – some so severely that they were knocked unconscious. I’ve also witnessed dozens of ground-fault… View this story
    Filed in: AVLive SoundRecordingChurch SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVInterconnectPowerSignalSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Monday, February 15, 2016
    image
    PSW Staff 02/15/16 11:08 AM,
    One of the most popular specialized microphone techniques is stereo miking. The use of two or more microphones to create a stereo image will often give depth and spatial placement to an instrument or overall recording. There are a number of different methods for stereo. Three of the most popular are the spaced pair (A/B), the coincident or near-coincident pair (X-Y configuration), and the md-side (M-S) technique. Spaced Pair Technique The spaced pair (A/B) technique uses two cardioid or omni… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallProductionAudioMicrophone

  • Tuesday, February 09, 2016
    live sound
    Nicholas Radina 02/09/16 12:14 PM,
    Career-building and understanding the “biz of the business” is important for everyone working in pro audio, but perhaps even more so for the independent practitioner, a.k.a., Lone Audio Ranger. So let’s step back a bit from the technical side and address some equally important techniques that can put you in control of the work you want and strategies to help you get more of it. Hiding In Plain Sight When it comes to “getting the gig,” being selected from a… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEducationEngineerNetworkingSound ReinforcementTechnician



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