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Articles Tagged Audio Basics

  • Sunday, November 08, 2015
    Mark Frink with Michael Santucci, Au.D. 11/08/15 01:31 PM,
    The many benefits of in-ear monitors include improved monitor and front of house sound, better pitch perception and timing, consistent monitor sound from one venue to the next, elimination of feedback, reduced vocal fatigue, complete mobility with wireless systems, lower audience sound levels and… the potential to reduce the sound exposure of performers and protect their hearing. But there’s no guarantee of the widely touted hearing conservation for IEM users: “Your mileage may vary.” Monitor engineers are motivated to provide… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallLoudspeakerMeasurementMonitoringSignalSoftwareSound Reinforcement

  • Thursday, November 05, 2015
    Mike Sessler 11/05/15 07:30 AM,
    This article is provided by ChurchTechArts.   I love reverb on vocals. It stands to reason; I grew up in the 1970s and 80s, when there were many records made with tons of reverb on vocals. Today, the pendulum has swung the other way and vocal reverb has become more minimalist. I’m not necessarily against minimal reverb on vocals, but I do often think that reverb covers a multitude of sins. And when we’re mixing audio in churches, having a… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMixerProcessorSignalSoftwareSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, November 04, 2015
    Kerrie Mondy 11/04/15 09:09 AM,
    This article is provided by   I have a curmudgeonly hate for modern technology. I like roll-up windows and faucet handles and telling stupid electronics what to do, when, and at what volume. I avoid the automated doors at stores in favor of the pull-handle ones. I think there’s something to human beings, to humans BEING, that technology at its zenith can’t beat. In the world of life, this makes me a dinosaur. In the world of audio, it… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallEducationEngineerMeasurementSignalSoftwareSound Reinforcement

  • Tuesday, November 03, 2015
    live sound
    Karl Winkler 11/03/15 12:06 PM,
    One of the biggest challenges any of us face in our careers, and maybe even personally, is communicating effectively. Sub-standard communication, or lack of it altogether, can severely damage or hold back an organization or an individual. And I’ve yet to find a problem or awkward situation that can’t be made almost immediately better with good communication. In the business of live sound reinforcement, there are numerous potential pitfalls in this regard, ranging from old riders to lack of a… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEducationEngineerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Friday, October 30, 2015
    Gary Parks 10/30/15 08:28 AM,
    Change in the intercom systems market marches on. The transition from analog to digital party-line systems continues, with multiple communications channels possible on a single microphone or data cable – though traditional analog intercoms are still widely used for less complex productions. Highlighting this transition, a Clear-Com digital two-channel HelixNet intercom speaker station shared space with an old-school call-signal flasher on the front of house console at the most recent Monterey Jazz Festival (pictured above/left). Supporting the trend toward digital… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalEthernetInterconnectMicrophoneNetworkingSignalWireless

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2015
    PSW Staff 10/27/15 12:20 PM,
    What is dynamic range? Dynamic range can be defined as the distance between the loudest possible level to the lowest possible level. For example, if a processor states that the maximum input level before distortion is +24 dBu and the output noise floor is -92 dBu, then the processor has a total dynamic range of 24 + 92 = 116 dB. However, the average dynamic range of an orchestral performance can range from - 50 dBu to +10 dBu on… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallAnalogDigitalProcessorSignal

  • image
    Daniel L. Newman 10/27/15 06:37 AM,
    This article is provided by Commercial Integrator   You walk into the office of a local architect and say, “Hi, I would like to tell you about the house I want to build, and I would like for you to design it and create drawings so I can have a contractor build it, and I want you to do this for free.” What do you suppose the architect would say? A while back, a well-known property development group called us… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVBusinessEngineerInstallationTechnician

  • Monday, October 26, 2015
    church sound
    Chris Huff 10/26/15 10:40 AM,
    This article is provided by Behind The Mixer.   Can the congregation tell who’s mixing? The question is not for reasons of pride but for consistency. The congregation should hear a predictable mix each week, and when a new audio tech joins the team, this can be a problem. The new tech could be experienced or fresh off the street. Either way, the mix needs to conform to the standard sound set forth by the audio team. It can be… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMixerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • Friday, October 23, 2015
    Pat Brown 10/23/15 11:56 AM,
      One of the most confusing subjects in audio? Loudspeaker power ratings. It’s generally accepted that a large loudspeaker power rating is a sign of quality and something to be desired. And it’s the performance metric that probably has the greatest influence on the consumer’s buying decision. But a closer look reveals that power rating is far less significant than other metrics regarding the performance of the loudspeaker. The term “power rating” requires further explanation to avoid misunderstanding. It’s tempting… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVLoudspeakerMeasurementPowerSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, October 21, 2015
    Wayne DuCharme 10/21/15 05:53 AM,
    This article is provided by CCI Solutions.   Many worship teams now include an electric guitar to reproduce the growing number of contemporary worship songs found on the radio and used in churches across America and abroad. The idea of an electric guitar came from the need to overcome the challenge of playing in a large ensemble since the acoustic guitars of the day could not compete with the volume of the other instruments. The original guitar amplifiers were simple… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementStage