Sign up for ProSoundWeb newsletters
Subscribe today!

Articles Tagged Audio Basics

  • Wednesday, May 18, 2016
    image
    Dana Troxel 05/18/16 10:48 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   Editor’s Note: This article was originally published through The Rane Library in 2005, yet the information is as relevant now as it was then. Acoustic feedback (also referred to as the Larsen effect) has been roaming around sound reinforcement systems for a very long time, and everyone seems to have their own way to tame the feedback lion. Digital signal processing opened up the microphone to some creative solutions, each with its… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVDigitalInstallationInterconnectMeasurementProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Monday, May 16, 2016
    church sound
    Mike Sokol 05/16/16 06:13 AM,
    Provided by Live Sound Advice.   If terms such as gain structure, impedance matching and headroom are unfamiliar, or worse, give you a headache, don’t worry, you’re not alone. Most church sound techs would rather have their gear work perfectly right out of the box than have to tweak it into compliance. Nevertheless, when it comes to setting up and operating a sound system, a working knowledge of gain structure (and a few related concepts) will help you get the… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierConsolesMeasurementMixerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSystem

  • Wednesday, May 11, 2016
    podcasts
    Craig Leerman 05/11/16 11:33 AM,
    As audio professionals, we’re usually not concerned with how the content of podcasts and webcasts is delivered. Our focus is getting quality audio to the recorder or computer and making things sound their best. I categorize casting and streaming into two basic groups: speech gigs and musical performances. Typically, the web conferences and corporate podcasts that I work consist mainly of speech with some pre-recorded music thrown in. Music performances are a bit more complex and I’ll address how to… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogConsolesDigitalInterconnectNetworkingProcessor

  • image
    Curt Taipale 05/11/16 06:34 AM,
    This article is provided by Church Soundcheck.com.   There are many things which shouldn’t happen during a worship service, yet still do. However, unless we’re cognizant of them sometimes it’s hard to prevent them. So I decided to create a list of those things that just shouldn’t happen in a worship service. Some of these may seem so silly, so expected, so taken for granted that they’re almost not worth saying. But you’d be surprised how many times I’ve seen… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEducationEngineerMixerSignalSound ReinforcementSystemTechnician

  • Tuesday, May 10, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Samantha Potter 05/10/16 12:14 PM,
    Finding the right day rate for freelance audio/production services isn’t easy for anyone at first. It’s a math problem that includes working with several complicated and random variables. There’s the need to ask other freelances in the area about it, doing the research, and worst (scariest?) of all, assigning a number to your worth as a professional. Let’s walk through it together. Here are some things to take into consideration before deciding a bare-minimum day rate: —What is the minimum… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEducationEngineerSound ReinforcementTechnician

  • image
    Pat Brown 05/10/16 06:42 AM,
      Crossover networks are not unique to audio and acoustics. The role of such a network is to produce a transition between two systems of differing capabilities. In a loudspeaker system, an increased overall bandwidth is achieved by splicing together two or more lower bandwidth transducer responses. An individual woofer, squawker and tweeter can form a full-range system through the use of a crossover network. Let’s look at some other systems that require similar transitions between their individual components. Several… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementProcessorSignal

  • Wednesday, May 04, 2016
    shure microphone world
    Tim Vear 05/04/16 12:12 PM,
    Lavalier Microphones The desired sound source for a lavalier microphone is a speaking (or occasionally singing) voice. Undesired sources include other speaking voices, clothing or movement noise, ambient sound, and loudspeakers. Balanced low-impedance output is preferred as usual. Adequate sensitivity can be achieved by both dynamic and condenser types, due to the relatively close placement of the microphone. However, a condenser is generally preferred. The physical design is optimized for body-worn use. This may be done by means of a… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016
    image
    Bruce Bartlett 04/26/16 12:34 PM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Nothing has more effect on the sound of your recordings than microphone technique. For example, which mic you choose—and where you place it—affect the recorded tone quality. That is, mic technique affects how much bass, midrange, and treble you hear in the monitored sound of a musical instrument. Mic choice and placement also affect how distant the instrument sounds in the recording, and how much background noise you pick up. This guide… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureProductionAudioMicrophoneSignalStudioSystem

  • dynamic processing
    PSW Staff 04/26/16 05:52 AM,
    Dynamic range can be defined as the distance between the loudest possible level to the lowest possible level. For example, if a processor states that the maximum input level before distortion is +24 dBu and the output noise floor is -92 dBu, then the processor has a total dynamic range of 24 + 92 = 116 dB. However, the average dynamic range of an orchestral performance can range from - 50 dBu to +10 dBu on average. This equates to… View this story
    Filed in: Church SoundFeatureStudy HallProcessorSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, April 20, 2016
    loudspeakers
    Pat Brown 04/20/16 06:53 AM,
      A loudspeaker array is a collection of loudspeakers that is assembled to achieve a coverage pattern that cannot be achieved with a single device. Arrays are most commonly implemented to achieve a wide horizontal coverage pattern from a position on or above the stage. The “perfect” array would be a collection of loudspeakers whose radiation pattern was indistinguishable from a single (hypothetical) device that provided the needed pattern for the audience area. Many attempts have been made to solve… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSound Reinforcement



Audio Central