Audio

Monday, July 30, 2012

Church Sound:Testing Cables Regularly Is A Big Key To Solid System Performance

A $10 microphone cable was compromising the sound of our $30,000 grand piano. Sound familiar?

Operating the sound system from the mix position during a recent Sunday worship service, it all began when the first note from our grand piano was distorted.

Hmm…

We’d checked the piano channel and sound prior to the service, and all was fine.

My first reaction to the distortion being produced was to reduce the gain on that console channel, thinking perhaps the piano player was nailing the keys very hard.

Yet the problem remained. Next, I did a pre-fade listen (PFL) in my headphones – yes, it was definitely distortion on the piano channel, no question about it.

To capture sound from this grand piano, we use a magnetic pickup from Helpinstill Designs, which sends the original vibrations of the strings (the source of the piano’s sound) directly to the mixing console.

If you’re struggling to reproduce a full, natural piano sound these pickups are definitely an option to consider.

Anyway, my next thought was that someone had accidentally bumped the pickup so that it was hitting some of the strings. Oh well, nothing could be done until the service ended, so I just did my best to work around and minimize the problem.

But a quick look immediately after the service showed that the pickup had not been disturbed.

Finding nothing else visibly wrong, we set up a few microphones to capture the piano in case we encountered the same problem during the next service, scheduled to start in less than 30 minutes.

Sure enough as the service began, here it came again - big-time piano distortion!

We quickly switched over to the backup mics, which covered us without major incident.

However, how I was perplexed and facing a challenge. What could it be? Perhaps the pickup unit itself was failing – my most logical guess at this point.

Prior to that evening’s service, we needed to move the piano to a different location on the platform.

Looking at the microphone cable connecting the pickup to the XLR jack in the floor box, it finally dawned on me to check that cable. Sure enough, it was going bad.

Thus, a $10 mic cable was compromising the sound of our $30,000 grand piano fed to our professional caliber sound system!

It often is the simple things, isn’t it? And yet another hard-earned lesson for yours truly.

To avoid this disruptive and embarrassing problem, all I had to do was invest in better cables, and further, regularly (say, once a month) check the performance of each one with another small investment: a cable tester.

The truth is that our church already owns a very good cable tester made by Whirlwind (called, appropriately enough, the TESTER), but I’d simply gotten out of the habit of using it regularly. Big mistake.

There are many models of cable testers available, and most are very simple to use and understand. A suitable one can be had for less than $100 from your contractor or retail store.

A device like the Whirlwind TESTER should be able to be interfaced with a variety of audio connectors, such as XLR, 1/4-inch and RCA. Once connected, the tester should quickly show, via a simple read-out on the unit’s front panel, if the cable and connector are working properly. Many will also show polarity (don’t call it phase!) reversal.

A “hands-free” design is preferred to allow manipulation of the cable to locate intermittent problems. In particular, I “wiggle” the ends of the cable right next to the connector to check for intermittent problems, because this is the most likely location where they occur.

Cable testers and testing may not be the “glamor” aspect of audio, but it’s a bedrock that allows the more glamorous parts (such as mixing) to flourish. Why let one of the least expensive aspects of a system be its weakest link?

Gary Zandstra is a professional AV systems integrator with Parkway Electric and has been involved with sound at his church for more than 25 years.

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/30 at 11:12 AM
Church SoundFeatureStudy HallEducationInstallationInterconnectSound ReinforcementStageSystemTechnicianAudioPermalink

Phase Cancellation: The Drum Sound Destroyer

One of the most important and overlooked aspects of drum mic'ing

This article is excerpted from Bobby Owsinki’s “The Drum Recording Handbook.”

One of the most important and overlooked aspects of drum mic’ing is making sure that the mics are all in-phase.

This is really important because with only one out-of-phase mic, the whole kit will never sound right, and if not corrected before all the drums are mixed together, it can never be fixed.

So just what is phase anyway? Without getting into a heavy explanation, it just means that all the microphones are pushing and pulling together.

If one mic is pushing while another is pulling, they cancel each other out. Check out the diagram of Figure 1.

In this figure, both mics are pushing and pulling together. Their signal peaks happen at the same time as does their valleys.

As a result, their signals reinforce one another. In Figure 2, when mic 1’s signal peaks, mic 2’s signal valleys. They cancel each other out and result in a very weak sounding signal when mixed together.

Acoustic Phase Cancellation
There are two types of phasing problems that can happen—electronic and acoustic.

An acoustic phasing problem occurs when two mics are too close together and pick up the same signal at the same time, only one is picking it up a little later than the first because it’s a little farther away.

Figure 1: Two microphones in-phase.

With acoustic phase problems, the sounds won’t cancel each other out completely, only at certain frequencies. This usually makes the mix of the two together sound either hollow or just lacking depth and bottom end.

The way to eliminate the problem is by moving mic 2 a little further away from mic 1, or if the mics are directional, make sure that each one is pointing directly at the source that they’re trying to capture.

Keeping the mics parallel to each other, or at a 90-degree angle for mics underneath drums will also really make a difference.

Electronic Phase Cancellation
Why would there be an electronic phase problem? Almost all of the time it’s because a mic cable is mis-wired; it was either repaired incorrectly or originally wired incorrectly from the factory (which is rare).

There are two ways to check the electronic phase.

Checking Phase The Easy Way
Here’s a very easy way to check mic phase, although not as precisely as method #2 shown later.

After you get a mix balance of the kit together, flip the phase selector on each mic channel one at a time either on your console or on the DAW.

Whichever position has the most low end, leave it there. Do this on every mic in the kit (select the overhead and room mics in a pair, but check the left mic against the right as well).

Checking Phase The Slightly More Difficult Way
This method takes a bit more work, but you’ll know for sure if you have a mic cable that’s wired backward. Also, you really have to have another person with you to make this work. It’s a two-man operation.

First you have to pick a mic and make it your “reference.” Any mic on the kit will do, but it’s easier to pick an overhead or a mic that can easily come off the stand.

Figure 2 Two microphones out-of-phase.

Now take your reference mic and put it next to another mic on the kit, say the kick drum mic, as in Figure 3. Make sure that each mic is at the exact same volume level in the speakers, not fader level.

Now have someone talk into the mic while you switch the phase selector on either the console or DAW. Again, choose the selection that sounds the fullest.

Do this to each microphone. Any channel that has its phase selector different from all the others has a mis-wired cable. Make sure you mark it so you don’t have the same problem again!

Times When You Might Want The Phase Reversed
There are times when you should definitely consider flipping the phase before you start mixing.

Figure 3 Checking the electronic phase.

As we said before, there may be some acoustic phase issues as well because even though a mic may be further away than another, it may still be picking up the same source.

In the following cases, the phase should be flipped to overcome an acoustic phase problem.

An Under-Snare Mic: The under-snare mic should just about always be flipped out of-phase.

Any Under-Drum Mic: Anytime a mic is placed underneath a drum, it’s phase should almost always be flipped
out of phase.

Room Mics: Depending upon where they’re placed, how much room reflection they’re receiving, and how high they’re used in the mix, sometimes the room mics sound a lot better if the phase is reversed.

Overhead Mics in Extremely Rare Cases: Once again, it depends upon how high they’re placed above the kit, what kind of reflections they’re receiving and if they’re the main sound of the kit, but on rare occasions it might sound better (meaning fuller) if the phase is flipped.


 
Editor Note: This article is the first in a series on drums, excerpted from Bobby Owsinki’s “The Drum Recording Handbook”. Other articles in the series are available here.

Click to enlarge book cover

To acquire this book, click over to the ProSoundWeb Book Store. NOTE: ProSoundWeb readers receive free shipping when entering promotional code PSW at checkout. (offer valid to U.S. residents, applies only to media mail shipping, additional charges may apply for expedited mailing services).

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Posted by admin on 07/30 at 10:54 AM
RecordingFeaturePollStudy HallAnalogEducationEngineerMicrophoneMixerSignalStudioAudioPermalink

Audinate’s Dante NetworksThe Queen’s Diamond Jubilee

An event of this magnitude required a reliable and flexible networking transport. Audinate's award winning Dante technology was chosen as the digital media network backbone for all the live sound events and festivities.

Last month millions turned out in London, England, to mark Queen Elizabeth’s 60 years on the throne. Not since Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee 1897, has Great Britain celebrated a monarch’s 60th anniversary.

Needless to say an event of this magnitude required a reliable and flexible networking transport, and Audinate’s award winning Dante technology was chosen as the digital media network backbone for all the live sound events and festivities. 

Audio production house Britannia Row Productions was responsible for all the live sound. Joshua Lloyd was the system designer who designed the sound system (that needed to be invisible) for the seated invited audience around the temporary stage constructed on the Queen Victoria Monument.

“It was necessary to create a large distributed system to achieve this goal” comments Lloyd. “We used 24 stacks of Outline Butterfly loudspeakers, for a total of 96 boxes, to create this complex system. Each stack of Butterfly’s was driven by a Lake LM series processor, and all were networked together using off-the-shelf Cisco switches over a standard IP network.”

The sound system consisted of 100’s of cabinets and over 4 square miles (6.5km) of fiber optic cabling. Naturally a system of this size required a large matrix solution. Two Yamaha DME 64N units equipped with Dante-MY16-AUD networking cards were deployed; these in turn were connected to 6 XTA Dante Breakout boxes as well as the 48 LM series processors.

Audinate is leading the way networks are connected by transporting high-quality media over standard IT networks. Its Dante products deliver a no-hassle, self-configuring, true plug-and-play digital audio network that uses standard Internet Protocols.

Lloyd concludes, “This system could not have worked on analog, as the distances involved were so great, and the interference from every kind of signal and power cabling would have seriously damaged the audio quality.  Single mode fiber optic cabling was the only viable solution, and the sheer number of nodes required meant that using Dante Audio over IP was the simplest, most cost effective way to achieve this. ” 

Lee Ellison, Audinate’s CEO adds, “Everyone at Audinate is very proud to have been involved as a part of this moment in Great Britain’s history. As far as I know, this event was one of the largest crowds of people to ever hear audio over a Dante digital media network. ”

Audinate

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/30 at 10:00 AM
Live SoundNewsPollDigitalNetworkingSound ReinforcementAudioPermalink

TELEFUNKEN “Mix” Olympics To Coincide With 2012 Summer Olympics

TELEFUNKEN Elektroakustik of South Windsor, CT, is hosting the first TELEFUNKEN Mix Olympics, coinciding with the 2012 Summer Olympics taking place in London, England. Three mixing events will be held, and for each event winners will be awarded Gold, Silver, and Bronze M80 dynamic microphones.

TELEFUNKEN Elektroakustik of South Windsor, CT, is hosting the first TELEFUNKEN Mix Olympics, coinciding with the 2012 Summer Olympics taking place in London, England. 

Three mixing events will be held, and for each event winners will be awarded Gold, Silver, and Bronze M80 dynamic microphones.

Starting on July 27th, participants will be able to download audio files from three multi-track sessions provided by TELEFUNKEN in 44.1k/24-bit format.

Each of these complete song session files will be used as the three main events for the Mix Olympics. The competition will conclude on August 19, shortly after the closing ceremony of the London games.

Winners will be announced the week of August 20th.

TELEFUNKEN Multi-Track Session Files are an excellent source for pristinely recorded audio.  These sessions can be used as teaching tools, for microphone auditioning / comparative analysis, and in this case, to have a little competitive fun while gaining valuable experience.

All three songs have been recorded using only TELEFUNKEN Elektroakustik microphones, and many of the sources will have been recorded with more than one microphone. 

Mixing participants can listen and choose which of the microphones supplies the most pleasing aesthetic for their competitive mix efforts.  As mixes are submitted, they will be shared on TELEFUNKEN’s Soundcloud page, and each song mixing event will have its own set of Soundcloud postings for the participants and general public to reference.

Songs to be mixed are:
      * Human Radio - “You & Me & The Radio”
      * Sunshine Garcia Band - “For I Am The Moon”
      * O.A.K. Team - “Girls with Glasses”

For each song, three M80 mics will be awarded. 

Gold will be judged and awarded by the artist; winner will receive a Gold M80. 

Silver will be judged by a panel of professionals assembled by TELEFUNKEN Elektroakustik; winner will receive a Silver M80. 

Bronze will be judged by the guys in the shop that actually make the microphones; winner receives a Bronze M80.

TELEFUNKEN Elektroakustik

 

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/30 at 09:30 AM
RecordingNewsPollBusinessMicrophoneMixerStudioAudioPermalink

V&P Sound Heats Up Lamb of God Concert In India With JBL VerTec Line Arrays

Rapidly gaining the reputation as the ‘Metal Capital of India,’ Bengaluru has hosted some of the world’s most popular bands, including Lamb of God’s second appearance in the country. A sound and lighting system highlighted the performance, featuring JBL VerTec line arrays, loaded with V5 DSP presets.

Rapidly gaining the reputation as the ‘Metal Capital of India,’ Bengaluru has hosted some of the world’s most popular bands, including Lamb of God’s second appearance in the country.

A sound and lighting system highlighted the performance, featuring JBL VerTec line arrays, loaded with V5 DSP presets.

The JBL VerTec line arrays, deployed by V&P Sound of India, supported the sound output required for the concert. The use of V5 tunings during this concert is one of the largest in India since its introduction.

The concert was held in the Clarks Exotica Resort, located in the outskirts of Bengaluru.

The Lamb of God concert was organized under the ‘Nokia Alive’ series, promoted by Overture India, a popular event management company. The 7,000-plus fans in attendance reinforced the true metal spirit of Bengaluru and the need for a powerful audio system.

The entire crowd was electrified during the hours of intense, high-performance sound, which featured an audio system of 20 JBL VT4889 fullsize line array elements and 16 VT4883 compact arrayable subwoofers for the center and mosh pit fills.

Crown I-Tech HD amplifiers powered the system.

“We love the V5 presets and their performance—they offer a true sound with great magnitude,” stated Vishnu P., owner of V&P Sound. “The VT4889 has excellent long-throw capabilities and V5 offers significant improvements in horizontal coverage in the high-frequency and low-mid ranges.

“We also like the changes that have been made to the low frequencies with V5. Overall, we are very pleased with the performance of the system.”

Vishnu P. continued, “We are now using new V5 DSP presets and did not have to use much EQ on the system.  V5 has undoubtedly given new life to our existing VerTec system. We would like to congratulate Paul Bauman and his team for this fantastic product.”

“With sophisticated 3-stage limiting, including long-term thermal protection allowing for higher peak and RMS thresholds, the power translated into increased SPL output and rock-solid limiting.

“This makes the V5 presets more impactful, adding pristine clarity to the sound output” added Mallesh T., mix engineer for V&P Sound.

To provide the best microphone solutions for the stage, AKG microphones were deployed, including the AKG Drum SET II and AKG Rhythm Pack, as well as D40’s for the two separate drum kits. A portion of the concert’s acts were mixed with the Soundcraft Vi6 console at FOH.

“As a rental sound partner who has always led the way in adapting the latest technologies introduced by HARMAN, V&P Sound has created yet another yardstick for live sound in India,” said David McKinney, Senior Director- India Operations, Harman Professional.

JBL

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/30 at 09:00 AM
Live SoundNewsPollConcertLine ArrayLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementAudioPermalink

Latin Music Maestro Angel Fernández Gets The SSL Sound

Solid State Logic is pleased to announce that multi-talented arranger, composer, musical director, and producer Angel Fernández has upgraded his Queens, NYC-based ‘Missing Lynx’ project recording studio to center around an SSL X-Desk.

Solid State Logic is pleased to announce that multi-talented arranger, composer, musical director, and producer Angel Fernández has upgraded his Queens, NYC-based ‘Missing Lynx’ project recording studio to center around an SSL X-Desk.

Angel Fernández is well known in a touring and performing capacity as long-time Musical Director for Grammy winning Latin American superstar (and occasional actor) Marc Anthony.

When not living in the limelight, touring and performing, Fernández can usually be found in his beloved project studio.

“Missing Lynx has become like a little haven for me. I don’t have to travel long distances anymore to find a place to record, plus I get to say, ‘Welcome to my place!’

“Visiting producers and musicians enjoy the relaxed atmosphere because they’re simply friends stopping by to do a recording session.”

Fernández is very busy during his touring downtime, giving the sought-after trumpeter and guitarist an opportunity to shine offstage in more ways than one with a constant stream of renowned Latin musicians and recording projects passing through.

“I get a good amount of work for arranging and producing, which is a blessing these days in the current economic climate of the music business,”  Fernández explains.

No stranger to the international recording scene, Angel instinctively knew what he was seeking, sound-wise, when turning to SSL.

“I worked with producer Steve Lillywhite quite a few times. He always used SSL to mix, and — on the sessions I was involved in — to track as well,”  Fernández adds. “I heard a definite sound, which was explained to me in part by producer Nick Launay — who engineered some projects for Lillywhite — when he demonstrated the use of the SSL compressor for sidechaining.

“He played me a drum track, which he used as the trigger for the horn section sidechain, and said, ‘Do you recognise the sound? It’s what Earth, Wind And Fire use to get that tight groove going.’”

Angels’s quest to achieve that same quality of sound in his busy private studio led him to the X-Desk.

“The main goal in switching my console for the X-Desk was to enhance the sound in the final product,” he explains. “Before the X-Desk, I’d bounce the mixes within my Pro Tools|HD system.

“The combination of being able to take advantage of the full capability of the DAW I/O together with the SuperAnalogue summing in the X-Desk has resulted in much clearer mixes.”

This journey to mixing clarity came to a head on Angel’s latest Latino production.

“The LD & Johni project has tons of tracks, and we’d been racking our brains trying to mix it to no avail — panning to the max to achieve separation, using frequency analyzer software to cut unnecessary frequencies wherever possible, EQ’ing, etc, all with the aim of achieving as much clarity as possible,”  Fernández concludes. “But once we went with the new setup based around the X-Desk we instantly heard the wider spectrum, pop, and clarity in the mixes that we’d been striving for — without any tweaking at all we’d hit the warm SSL sound.”

Renkus-Heinz has announced the appointment of Native Media Sales as the company’s newest sales representatives.

Native Media Sales was founded by audio industry veteran Michael Austin, who has spent more than 25 representing some of professional audio’s biggest names.

He has also served on a number of representative councils and advisory boards for several manufacturers.

Native Media will cover the Renkus-Heinz line for the Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana area.

“We’re really pleased to welcome Native Media Sales as our newest reps,” commented Rik Kirby, Renkus-Heinz VP of Sales and Marketing. “Michael and his company are more than just a rep firm - they have a fresh approach and a keen understanding of today’s market.

“This is an extremely important region for us and we’re excited to be working with Native Media to grow our presence there. This territory is one of the most influential, both domestically and internationally, and we’re looking forward to continuing our success.”

“It’s a privilege to be working with one of the most respected names in our industry,” added Austin. “Renkus-Heinz has an amazing history as an innovator and a technology leader, and we’re thrilled to add them to our client list.”

Renkus-Heinz

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/27 at 06:53 AM
AVLive SoundChurch SoundNewsPollAVBusinessLine ArrayLoudspeakerManufacturerSound ReinforcementAudioPermalink

Clearwing Productions Installs KARA at First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre

Using L-Acoustics’ SOUNDVISION acoustical modeling software, Clearwing’s Bryan Baumgardner designed a complementary delay system featuring four arrays of KARA: two main LR arrays each comprised of 12 cabinets, and two outer arrays of nine enclosures.

With over 10,000 reserved shed seats and room for nearly 18,000 more on its expansive sloped lawn, First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre, located just south of Chicago in Tinley Park, is the Midwest’s largest outdoor concert space.

Owned and operated by Live Nation, the venue recently hired Clearwing Productions of Milwaukee to design and install a full lawn delay system, which now is comprised of 42 L-Acoustics KARA enclosures.

With all acts coming through the venue carrying their own FOH production, Live Nation required a new delay system for its sizable lawn audience that would meet or beat the audio quality experienced by those under the shed.

Using L-Acoustics’ SOUNDVISION acoustical modeling software, Clearwing’s Bryan Baumgardner designed a complementary delay system featuring four arrays of KARA: two main LR arrays each comprised of 12 cabinets, and two outer arrays of nine enclosures.

Under the guidance of Clearwing’s Kevin Gillson, the arrays were flown under the back lip of the shed roof and are powered by a total of eight LA8 amplified controllers.

According to Live Nation Central Region Production Director Chris Weathers, Clearwing won the project bid both on its reputation for service and the comprehensive SOUNDVISION models that Baumgardner provided.

“Clearwing came out earlier this year, took a bunch of photos and measurements of the venue, imported those details into the computer, and then gave us several potential system designs to choose from,” he says. “The visual models spoke a thousand words in terms of exactly what coverage and level we would achieve with each system, and how we would minimize the noise pollution into the community just beyond our perimeter.

“It made it extremely easy to show management how an L-Acoustics system would overcome the obstacles and challenges that our previous system had failed to adequately address.

“We’re extremely happy with the KARA arrays that Clearwing installed. It’s an outrageous system – and I mean the good kind!

“The coverage across the entire lawn is extremely balanced and clear, and I’ve already had a number of touring engineers tell me that it’s the best-sounding delay system they’ve heard.”

“With nearly two-thirds of our audience seated on the lawn during sold-out performances, the majority of our customers are now hearing shows on the new delay system, which is an obvious improvement,” he adds. “In the grand scheme of things, I really think that our purchase of KARA and LA8 will equate to much higher customer satisfaction and, ultimately, better ticket sales, so it’s a great return on investment.”

Hosting an extremely wide variety of musical artists – from country, pop and rock to hip-hop, alternative and metal – First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre annually welcomes more than 400,000 music fans each year.

L-Acoustics

 

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/27 at 06:44 AM
Live SoundNewsPollConcertLine ArrayLoudspeakerSound ReinforcementAudioPermalink

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Audio-Technica Honors Online Marketing With President’s Award

Audio-Technica is pleased to announce that Wadsworth, Ohio-based Online Marketing has been presented with A-T’s prestigious President’s Award, for their work representing Audio-Technica in Indiana and Kentucky.

Audio-Technica is pleased to announce that Wadsworth, Ohio-based Online Marketing has been presented with A-T’s prestigious President’s Award, for their work representing Audio-Technica in Indiana and Kentucky.

Additionally, the firm sells Audio-Technica professional products to retailers and sound contractors in Ohio, Michigan, Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Online Marketing Sales Associate Steve Grigdesby accepted the award, which recognizes a leading manufacturer’s representative for outstanding commitment and dedication during the Audio-Technica 2011/2012 fiscal year. The award was presented by Philip Cajka, Audio-Technica U.S. President and C.E.O., and Michael Edwards, A-T V.P. Professional Products.

Also in attendance were Brian Strong, A-T Territory Manager, Professional Products; David Marsh, A-T Director of Sales & Marketing, Installed Sound & Broadcast; along with Online Marketing personnel Mike Wuellner, Principal; and Jon Johnson, Sales. The A-T President’s Award was presented at a ceremony during the 2012 InfoComm Expo on June 13th in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Michael Edwards commented, “Online Marketing has been presented with this honor for their strong dedication to sales performance, customer care and the marketing of the A-T brand. The Online Marketing team has a vast base of knowledge and experience, in addition to their fierce work ethic. We are proud to give them this honor, and extremely grateful for their continued service.”

Audio-Technica

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/26 at 03:55 PM
AVLive SoundRecordingChurch SoundNewsPollBusinessManufacturerSound ReinforcementAudioPermalink

Extron Introduces New 12x8 Audio DSP With Acoustic Echo Cancellation

Offers a configuration approach to DSP that simplifies mixing, routing, conferencing, and room optimization

Extron Electronics has introduced the DMP 128 digital matrix processor, a 12 x 8 audio mixer with Extron ProDSP, automixing, I/O expansion capabilities, and available AEC - acoustic echo cancellation.

The DMP 128 offers a configuration approach to DSP that simplifies mixing, routing, conferencing, and room optimization.

Quick and intuitive configuration using the DSP Configurator software allows the DMP 128 to be installed in very little time, with easy-to-learn adjustments that can be heard in real-time.

A digital audio expansion port allows two DMP 128 units to be linked together to expand input and output signal management and routing capabilities.

The DMP 128 has been designed for presentation and conferencing applications in boardrooms, courtrooms, and conference centers that require advanced matrix mixing with DSP.

“The DMP 128 is our latest ProDSP processor, offering what our customers have been requesting: a larger 12x8 audio matrix mixer and acoustic echo cancellation,” says Casey Hall, vie president of sales and marketing for Extron. “Extron AEC employs advanced processing engineered for robust, dependable echo cancellation in videoconference scenarios, and is very easy to set up and configure within the user-friendly DSP Configurator Software.

“An expansion port enables further flexibility for sound system designers working with larger systems, allowing two DMP 128 units to be linked to create an expanded matrix.”

The DMP 128 C and DMP 128 C P models include Extron AEC for conferencing applications. AEC - acoustic echo cancellation prevents audio at the near end from being returned to the far end as echo, ensuring clear, natural conversations for far end participants.

These models include eight independent channels of high performance AEC, as well as selectable noise cancellation. AEC processing can be challenged by conditions such as double-talk, when talkers from both ends are speaking simultaneously, and when near end talkers use wireless microphones.

Extron AEC provides advanced algorithms that deliver fast echo canceler convergence for optimal intelligibility, even in challenging conditions.

The DMP 128 C P model includes analog phone interfacing with POTS line and phone connections.

Extron ProDSP is engineered from the ground up using a 32/64-bit floating point DSP engine and studio grade 24-bit audio converters with 48 kHz sampling.

It is managed by the DSP Configurator software, a PC-based application featuring an easy-to-use GUI that allows for complete audio system visualization within a single window.

Designers can quickly get a snapshot view of the entire audio system, including processing blocks and routing assignments, all at once.

The DMP 128 features a gating automixer with eight gate groups for management of microphone signal levels. The amount of signal level reduction is user-selectable per channel, to avoid the “chopped” sound characteristic of a traditional automixer when a mic is gated off.

The DMP 128 includes several advanced automixing features for optimizing microphone management. Multiple trigger protection allows only the mic with the highest signal to be active while the rest are gated off.

A global automixer configuration screen in the DSP Configurator software enables fast, intuitive management of all mics and groups in a centralized user interface. The number of open microphones can be specified in the automixer, to limit the number of active mics at one time.

Extron Electronics

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/26 at 12:59 PM
AVLive SoundNewsProductAVDigitalInstallationProcessorAudioPermalink

QSC Networking Platform Installed At Grand Theatre In Gansu Province

Q-Sys, the integrated system platform from QSC Audio Products, is playing a controlling role at a recently built, 50-million-dollar theatre in Western China, an impressively modern symbol of the new economy in the Far East.

Q-Sys, the integrated system platform from QSC Audio Products, is playing a controlling role at a recently built, 50-million-dollar theatre in Western China, an impressively modern symbol of the new economy in the Far East.

The striking new Grand Theatre in Lanzhou, capital of the province of Gansu in Western China, opened in late 2011, a excitingly modern building of rounded corners and flowing, curved glass constructed at an approximate cost of 350 million RMB (over $50 million US).

With a large-scale 1500-seat auditorium, a 300-seat hall and a press conference chamber of 150 seats, plus 20 smaller meeting rooms, the 7-storey state-of-the-art theatre was envisaged as a multi-disciplinary building with the ability to host conventions and events as well as drama and concerts.

Designed according to the guiding principles of the project — which were that the new theatre should exhibit the best in scientific, environmental and sustainable principles — intelligent, networked audio systems are used throughout, centrally controlled by the Q-Sys platform. The QSC systems were supplied by PCI, the exclusive QSC distributor in China.

Q-Sys is used to process and route all the audio in the main auditorium, the 300-seat hall and the building’s PA/VA public address/alarm system, right down to controlling individual loudspeakers and amplifiers where required.

Each conference room at the theatre (22 in total) has its own Q-Sys I/O Frame which controls the audio inputs, routing and loudspeakers in each room. All are centrally accessible from the two Q-Sys Core 3000 master processors in the theatre’s main control room, to which all of the I/O Frames are linked by the building’s internal CAT-6 network connections.

Wall-mounted control panels with software running in a variety of local languages allow per-room control of the Q-Sys routing and processing functions. Access is also possible via wireless laptops and tablets for admin and troubleshooting functions throughout the building, allowing management of all the systems by just a few technicians, with full redundancy.

“The technical systems at the Gansu theatre set a new standard in intelligent, sustainable systems, within China and beyond,” commented a spokesman for the new theatre. “Q-Sys, the advanced audio networking system, plays a large part in setting that standard. The system has been the perfect choice for us.”

QSC Audio Products

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Posted by Keith Clark on 07/26 at 11:53 AM
Live SoundNewsPollInstallationSound ReinforcementAudioPermalink
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