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Recording Features

  • Tuesday, February 05, 2013
    recording
    Bobby Owsinski 02/05 05:42 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   Here’s an excerpt from The Music Producer’s Handbook regarding a checklist for overdubs. If you want your overdubs to go fast and easy, follow this list. It works every time. Do you have a list of overdub priorities? Do you know which overdubs absolutely must get done and which ones are less important? A list will keep you on track budget-wise and time-wise. Can you record in the control room? Most players… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEducationEngineerStudioTechnician

  • Friday, February 01, 2013
    recording
    Joe Gilder 02/01 03:24 PM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   G.I.R.A.T.S. — what is that all about? What does it stand for? It stands for something that you should print out and plaster all over your studio. It should be on your computer desktop and screensaver. It should be the motto behind EVERYTHING you do in your studio. What is it? GET IT RIGHT AT THE SOURCE. I’ve said it plenty of times before, but I can think of no better… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogConsolesDigital Audio WorkstationsMicrophoneStudio

  • Thursday, January 31, 2013
    recording
    Matthew Weiss 01/31 03:05 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   The original idea for this article was to write something on getting great vocal production. But as I started formulating the ideas, I realize they kind of apply to music globally. I feel that the basis of great music is fairly simple. Recorded music is a transcription of feelings. Much like how a microphone converts sound waves into electricity, and speakers convert electricity into sound — emotion is converted into… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallProductionAudioEngineerStudioTechnician

  • Wednesday, January 30, 2013
    recording
    Bobby Owsinski 01/30 03:08 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   Here’s a recording checklist derived from both The Recording Engineer’s Handbook and Audio Recording Basic Training that, if followed, will pretty much keep any engineer, or musician trying to record himself or his band, out of trouble. 1. Does the instrument sound great acoustically? Make sure that you start with a great acoustic sound with the instrument well-tuned and minimum of sympathetic vibrations and extraneous noises. 2. Are the mics acoustically in… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerSignalStudio

  • Thursday, January 24, 2013
    image
    Jason Corey 01/24 08:39 AM,
    From Audio Production and Critical Listening: Technical Ear Training by Jason Corey, published by Focal Press. In addition to being a utilitarian device for managing the dynamic range of recording media, dynamics processing has become a tool for altering the color and timbre of recorded sound. When applied to a full mix, compression and limiting can help the elements of a mix coalesce. The compressed musical parts will have what is known in auditory perception as common fate because their… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallProductionAudioConsolesEducationProcessorSignalStudioSystem

  • Wednesday, January 16, 2013
    recording
    Rob Schlette 01/16 05:49 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   There are a lot of different ways to conceptualize ‘dynamics’ when we begin to think about a contemporary recording project. Some of them are powerful, and some of them are pointless. This article points out a few useful techniques for addressing dynamics during mixing, with mastering in mind. Let’s start by considering dynamics at the largest most ‘zoomed out’ level. The fundamental question is whether it is musically appropriate for… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMixerStudio

  • Monday, January 14, 2013
    recording
    Bobby Owsinski 01/14 04:48 PM,
    The rhythm section is the heart and soul of a song as it provides both the pulse and the key center, and that’s why it’s so important to get the correct balance in a mix. It would be nice if everything sounded so good that you didn’t have to add a thing but that’s not usually the case. Here are a few tips taken from both The Mixing Engineer’s Handbook and The Audio Mixing Bootcamp that can help get that… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMixerProcessorStudio

  • Thursday, January 10, 2013
    recording
    Joe Gilder 01/10 05:41 PM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   In a microphone shoot-out that I did a few years ago between the Shure SM7B and SM58, I discussed some of the reasons for using a dynamic microphone for lead vocals as opposed to a condenser. One of the main reasons is that dynamics tend to pick up less of the room, so if you have a noisy room or just an acoustically bad-sounding room, a dynamic mic might allow you… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallMeasurementSignalStudio

  • Wednesday, January 09, 2013
    recording
    Matthew Weiss 01/09 09:57 AM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   I’m writing this on a train up to NY. I’ve got K’Naan’s album “Troubador” playing through my headphones right now, and really vibing on the music. But as I often do while listening, even casually, I’m admiring the arrangement of sounds, textures, movement, and tones. Hats off to Manny Marroquin, as these mixes are really incredible. It’s got me meditating on how to “open up” a mix — to allow… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesEngineerMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Tuesday, January 08, 2013
    recording
    Bobby Owsinski 01/08 01:30 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   Reader Hector Gutierrez wrote in with a couple of questions that I’m happy to answer. Here we go: How do you become a producer? You’re a producer when you have a client that trusts you with their music. They have to feel comfortable with you personally first and foremost, but they also need to know that you’ll help them make the right decisions. Work with as many artists as you can in… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogBusinessEngineerStudioTechnician



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