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Recording Features

  • Tuesday, May 24, 2016
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    Joe Gilder 05/24 06:16 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   You hear it all over the place. “Help! My mixes don’t translate!” In other words, “My mix sounds awesome in my studio, but then when I play it anywhere else – in my car, on my stereo, on my iPod – it sounds awful.” What’s the problem? It could be any number of things – your monitors, your room, your headphones…maybe even your recordings themselves. But let’s step away from talking… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogProductionAudioAnalogEducationEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudioSystem

  • Tuesday, May 17, 2016
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    Mike Joseph 05/17 08:02 AM,
    From the July 1990 issue of the late, great Recording Engineer/Producer (RE/P) magazine, technical editor Mike Joseph interviews a studio owner competing against the big boys and flying under the radar. In an effort to promote balanced journalism, RE/P has endeavored to present both sides of the ongoing issues surrounding commercially directed, so-called home project studios. More of a strong concern in the U.S. major coastal markets, the ethical and legal aspects of low-overhead, for-profit, residentially based audio production facilities… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureAnalogBusinessDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerStudio

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    Bobby Owsinski 05/17 05:59 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   The overdubbing stage can be something as simple as fixing or replacing some of the basic tracks (like the bass, rhythm guitar, solos, and lead vocal) or as complex as adding sophisticated layering of horns and strings, multiple guitars, keyboards, and background vocals. It’s also the phase of the project during which the most experimenting is done, since even the most meticulously designed parts sometimes don’t work and require some alteration. The… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerStudio

  • Monday, May 09, 2016
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    Joe Gilder 05/09 05:30 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   Once upon a time, Joe made a stupid mistake. I was recording a bunch of acoustic guitar tracks for an album project. I was super-excited. I had set aside an entire afternoon to knock out all the songs. Also, I had just gotten a brand new microphone, and was going to use it along with another mic to record the guitar in stereo. All was right with the world. I set… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureMicrophoneSignalStudio

  • Friday, May 06, 2016
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    PSW Staff 05/06 03:29 PM,
    ProSoundWeb presents at least two feature articles every day of the working week, meaning that there are 40-plus long-form articles highlighted each and every month. That’s a lot. In fact, so much so that we got to thinking that it would be handy to present a round-up of the most-read articles for those who might have missed at least some of them the first time around. What follows is the top 5 most-read articles on PSW for the month of… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundRecordingChurch SoundFeatureAnalogDigitalEngineerSound ReinforcementStudioTechnician

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    Barry Rudolph 05/06 06:13 AM,
    Many studios built in the 1970’s were designed not to have any acoustic influence on the recorded sound produced in them. This was accomplished by over-deadening walls, floors and ceilings so no sound waves (leakage) would reflect and add (or subtract) from the instrument’s original sound waves. Bass traps were purpose-built for controlling sound from electric bass amps, small isolated (and dead sounding) drum booths were mandatory and heavy gobos or baffles were used around all musicians separating them and… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsInstallationMeasurementSignalStudioSystem

  • Wednesday, May 04, 2016
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    Mike Rivers 05/04 05:48 AM,
    This article is provided by PreSonus.   In May 2014, the VU meter celebrated its 75th birthday. It has served the industry well, and when properly interpreted, it’s still useful. However, today’s digital recording processes have caused us to take a hard look at the usefulness and inadequacy of both the traditional VU meter and its modern replacement, the LED level meter, as tools for signal-level management. The classic VU meter, though relatively rare today (primarily because of cost), has… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAnalogDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMeasurementMonitoringSignalStudio

  • Monday, May 02, 2016
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    Bobby Owsinski 05/02 05:50 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   Whenever an engineer has trouble dialing in the EQ on a track, chances are its because of one or more of the 6 trouble frequency areas. These are areas where too much or too little can cause your track to either stick out like a sore thumb, or disappear into the mix completely. Let’s take a look. 200Hz (Mud) - Too much can cause the track or the mix to sound muddy… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEducationEngineerMonitoringSoftwareStudio

  • Wednesday, April 27, 2016
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    Jesse Sterling Harrison 04/27 06:00 AM,
    This article is provided by Sonicbids.com   Audio companies release a million new gadgets per week. For every piece of gear that one studio can’t live without, there’s another studio that’s never heard of it. But there are certain things no one should ever start a session without – some of them items you’re unlikely to think about until you need them. Here are seven critical pieces of the studio puzzle. 1. A Beautiful Pair Of Monitors A DAW for… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogBusinessEngineerStudio

  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016
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    Bruce Bartlett 04/26 12:34 PM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Microphones.   Nothing has more effect on the sound of your recordings than microphone technique. For example, which mic you choose—and where you place it—affect the recorded tone quality. That is, mic technique affects how much bass, midrange, and treble you hear in the monitored sound of a musical instrument. Mic choice and placement also affect how distant the instrument sounds in the recording, and how much background noise you pick up. This guide… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureProductionAudioMicrophoneSignalStudioSystem



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