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Recording Features

  • Friday, February 05, 2016
    monitors
    Bruce A. Miller 02/05 06:39 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Simply, good monitors are very important. Video productions monitor using screens. Audio productions monitor using loudspeakers that are driven by amplifiers. Every decision made in a musical production (not only regarding sounds but also arrangements and even performances) is based on what everyone is hearing. For example, if you’re recording a bass sound and the monitors sound thin, you may mistakenly believe that the bass sound itself is thin and compensate by adding… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierLoudspeakerMonitoringSignalStudio

  • Tuesday, February 02, 2016
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    Barry Rudolph 02/02 12:44 PM,
    Rhythm section tracking is the most important recording session in the production cycle of a record. The recording engineer captures the feel and sound of the musicians as they interpret the song and support the artist’s performance. The rhythm track’s sound is a component of the production style and identifies the record’s musical genre. I liken the track to the foundation of a house: you can’t build very high on a weak base! Subsequent overdubbed sweetening is just “window dressing”… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Thursday, January 28, 2016
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    Bruce Swedien 01/28 10:22 AM,
    Excerpted from the excellent “Make Mine Music” by Bruce Swedien, available from musicdispatch.com. It’s my opinion that after all is said and done, psychoacoustics is really why we are interested in recording music in the first place. Psychoacoustics can be defined simply as the psychological study of hearing. The true aim of psychoacoustic research is to find out how our hearing works. In other words, to discover how sounds entering the ear are processed by the ear and the brain… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallTrainingEngineerSignalStudioTechnician

  • Wednesday, January 27, 2016
    recording
    Jason Corey 01/27 04:34 PM,
    Editor’s Note: This is an excerpt from Audio Production and Critical Listening: Technical Ear Training, available from Focal Press. In the recording process, engineers regularly encounter technical issues that cause noises to be introduced or audio signals to be degraded inadvertently. To the careful listener, such events remove the illusion of transparent audio technology, revealing a recorded musical performance and reminding them that they are listening to a recording mediated by once invisible but now clearly apparent technology. It becomes… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallAnalogDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsInterconnectMixerPowerSignalStudio

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    Keith Clark 01/27 07:24 AM,
    Seventy-five years ago, a confident young entrepreneur in Chicago embarked on his career, combining an interest in sound with his work. On April 25, 1925, Sidney N. Shure rented a one-room office at 19 South Wells Street for five dollars per month and founded the Shure Radio Company, a business that sold kits for building radios at a time when factory-made radios were not yet available. As a child, S. N. Shure was fascinated by radio. In 1913, when he… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundRecordingFeatureStudy HallProductionAudioAnalogBusinessDigitalMicrophoneProcessorSound ReinforcementStudioWireless

  • Monday, January 25, 2016
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    Joe Gilder 01/25 07:10 AM,
    This article is provided by Home Studio Corner.   When I started recording more seriously, I was spending most of my time in professional studios. Fancy studios are awesome. You’ve got a pretty control room with a big console, patchbay, and couches. You’ve got a nice big tracking room, and you’ve probably got a couple of extra rooms or vocal booths thrown in there. All this is great, however, for those recording in personal studios, chances are the musicians you… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallProductionAudioDigitalInterconnectMixerSignalStudioSystem

  • Monday, January 18, 2016
    drum miking
    Daniel Keller 01/18 05:04 PM,
    Courtesy of Universal Audio.   Ask 10 recording engineers about recording drums and you’re likely to get more than 20 opinions. Few instruments combine subtle nuance and brute force the way a good drummer can, and capturing that sound has been the subject of hundreds of articles and thousands of conversations. So many different aspects affect the sound of a drum mix, starting with the player. Different skins, different shells, the type of sticks, the kick-drum beater all influence the… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • prosoundweb
    Karl Winkler 01/18 01:58 PM,
    When first starting down the audio path, I eagerly read every scrap of information I could get my hands on about how the “pros” approached their craft. What kind of gear were they using? What techniques? What was the “secret sauce”? In the late 1980s, I was much more interested in recording and had not yet seen the light about live sound reinforcement. And in those days, the Lord-Alge brothers were a big deal in the recording world. While Home… View this story
    Filed in: Live SoundRecordingFeatureBlogOpinionBusinessEngineerMicrophoneSignalSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Friday, January 15, 2016
    recording
    Bruce A. Miller 01/15 07:27 AM,
    This article is provided by BAMaudioschool.com.   Signal path refers to the path that sound makes while being processed. Recording signal paths include: Sound Source > Capturing Device > Wire From Capturing Device To Console Channel Input > Channel Volume, EQ, Etc. > Channel Output To Recorder Track Mixing signal paths include: Recorder Track To Console Channel Input > Channel Processing, Volume, Pan, Etc. > Channel Output To Stereo Bus > Main Stereo Output Master Fader > Final Mix In… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesInterconnectMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Wednesday, January 13, 2016
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    Caleb Hsu 01/13 11:41 AM,
    This article is provided by Sonicbids.com   The competition for landing an internship at a large-format recording facility is constantly increasing, and the expectations of assistants are higher than ever. If you want to get your foot securely in the door in a commercial recording studio, you’re expected to be technically proficient, musically skilled, aware of the current climate within the industry, and equipped with the social skills to work amidst a widely varying clientele roster. Luckily, we’ve got you… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureStudy HallBusinessDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerSoftwareStudio



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