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Recording Features

  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014
    recording
    Daniel Keller 04/16 05:56 PM,
    Courtesy of Universal Audio.   Love it or hate it, data compression (not to be confused with audio signal compression, which is a different issue) schemes like MP3, FLAC, AAC, and other relatives have fundamentally changed music as we know it. The battle between fidelity and portability was long ago declared no contest, with convenience winning hands-down over sonic quality. But while the ability to compress what was once a wall full of vinyl into your pocket is a boon… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigitalDigital Audio WorkstationsProcessorSignalSoftwareStudio

  • Tuesday, April 15, 2014
    dpa microphones
    Bruce Bartlett 04/15 12:44 PM,
    This article is provided by Bartlett Audio.   Some of the most popular instruments in many genres of music are keyboards, so let’s look at some techniques to capture a grand piano, upright piano, Leslie organ speaker, digital keyboard or synthesizer. Grand Piano This magnificent instrument is a challenge to record well. First have the piano tuned, and oil the pedals to reduce squeaks. You can prevent thumps by stuffing some foam or cloth under the pedal mechanism. One popular… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallConsolesMicrophoneProcessorSignalStudio

  • Monday, April 14, 2014
    image
    Bobby Owsinski 04/14 02:51 PM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   Reverb. It’s use goes through cycles from a lot to almost none, but you’ll usually find at least some reverb-type ambience used in every mix. The problem is that you can’t really tell much of a distinction between the different types of some inexpensive plug-ins or boxes. In case you’re a little fuzzy about the differences between the types of reverb available, here’s a little refresher excerpt from The Mixing Engineer’s Handbook… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsMeasurementProcessorSignalStudio

  • Friday, April 11, 2014
    recording
    Tim Crich 04/11 02:14 PM,
    Regardless of how long you’ve been in the business, there’s always room for improvement. Here are some tips to help your hearing, career, and maybe even blood pressure while in the recording studio. Praise The Lowered Work at lower volume levels. If the level must be up, get your sounds, then insert your earplugs, checking the sound once in a while at lower levels. There is nothing in the recording studio as important as your hearing. Longevity in the recording… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessConsolesEducationEngineerStudioTechnician

  • Thursday, April 10, 2014
    audio cable
    PSW Staff 04/10 02:14 PM,
    Provided by Sweetwater.   Q: I’m currently in the process of building a home studio and just at the point of wiring all of the raw cable to patch bays. However, I’m a bit stuck because I’m not sure what patch bays to get. Is one “style” of patch bay better/more durable than another? I guess the same question goes for the patch cables themselves. A: Wow, is this ever a loaded question. Because the industry can’t come to a… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallInterconnectSignalStudio

  • Wednesday, April 09, 2014
    recording
    Matthew Weiss 04/09 03:57 PM,
    This article is provided by the Pro Audio Files.   Have you ever believed that there’s just something badass engineers do that the rest of the world isn’t privy to? Are you disappointed when everyone on forums seems to agree that engineers are just using really good judgment and generally using basic processing? Well, don’t get your hopes up too much. 95 percent of a great mix stems from great decision making and the use of basic processing that everyone… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallEngineerMixerProcessorSignalStudio

  • Tuesday, April 08, 2014
    recording
    Joe Gilder 04/08 03:01 PM,
    Article provided by Home Studio Corner.   Have you ever mixed a song and really struggled to make the vocals cut through? The typical tricks involve equalizing out some lows or boost some highs, but that doesn’t always work. Plus, sometimes all that EQ leave the original vocal feeloing flat and lifeless. Another option is to really squeze the track with compression, but even still sometime that doesn’t have the desired effect, and even worse, there are times when the… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogVideoStudy HallEngineerMicrophoneProcessorSignalStudio

  • telefunken
    PSW Staff 04/08 02:22 PM,
    Provided by Sweetwater.   Q: I’ve heard that tube microphones should always be used upside down (with the diaphragm at the bottom). This is supposed to prevent heat from the tube from altering the frequency response of the mic. But I’ve seen a number of newer mics in which the mount does not allow for this. What’s the deal? A: In general, the mic designer will determine if the heat from an onboard vacuum tube is significant enough to alter… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallMicrophoneStudio

  • Monday, April 07, 2014
    recording
    Bobby Owsinski 04/07 07:20 AM,
    This article is provided by Bobby Owsinski.   One of the things that musicians, engineers and producers sometimes have trouble with is how much to charge for their time. Here’s an excerpt from The Music Producer’s Handbook that covers the pros and cons of all the alternatives. It’s aimed at producers, but just as applicable to engineers, musicians, and any professional trying to decide how much to charge. What if a local band asks you to produce them? What do… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallBusinessEngineerStudioTechnician

  • Wednesday, April 02, 2014
    recording
    Jon Tidey 04/02 02:49 PM,
    This article is provided by Audio Geek Zine.   Double tracking is a very common recording/production technique for almost any genre of music. When it comes to rhythm guitars, this technique is almost a standard method of recording with single tracking used only for solos. It’s also a technique that is often confusing for beginners. Double tracking simply means recording the same part twice and panning each to opposite sides. The guitarist plays a section of the song perfectly, then… View this story
    Filed in: RecordingFeatureBlogStudy HallDigital Audio WorkstationsEngineerMixerProcessorStudio





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