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A/V features

  • Friday, February 19, 2016
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    Pat Brown 02/19 11:37 AM,
      For professional audio people, the word “power” usually conjures up visions of racks of amplifiers are used to drive the loudspeakers in a sound system. But the amplifier and other system components must have a stable power source from which to operate.  Thus the issue of power distribution, all the way from Hoover Dam to your sound system, is vital. Some of the principles of audio signal distribution in sound systems are borrowed directly from utility companies, and so… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAmplifierAVMeasurementPowerSignal

  • Thursday, February 18, 2016
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    Mike Sessler 02/18 01:55 PM,
    This article is provided by ChurchTechArts.   One of the great things about the pro audio is that one has the ability to change one’s position on a particular topic. This is a fun one for me as I have argued on both sides of the issue at various points in my career. I suspect that the position I currently take might change again someday. Or not. One never knows. Full Range Fed Before we get into the pros and… View this story
    Filed in: AVChurch SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVEngineerLoudspeakerProcessorSignalSound ReinforcementSubwooferTechnician

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    Dennis A. Bohn 02/18 10:57 AM,
    This article is provided by Rane Corporation.   Wye-connectors (or “Y”-connectors, if you prefer) should never have been created. Anything that can be hooked-up wrong, will be. You-know-who said that, and she was right. A wye-connector used to split a signal into two lines is being used properly; a wye-connector used to mix two signals into one is being abused and may even damage the equipment involved. Here is the rule: Outputs are low impedance and must only be connected… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallTrainingAVEngineerInterconnectSystemTechnician

  • Wednesday, February 17, 2016
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    Craig Leerman 02/17 03:26 PM,
    The textbook definition of a microphone is a transducer that converts acoustical energy (sound waves) into electrical energy. Basically, a sound wave hits a diaphragm or membrane and causes it to vibrate. These vibrations are turned into electricity and flow out to the console. Mics are usually categorized by the conversion process that’s used to turn acoustical energy into electricity. The most common type used on live stages are dynamic designs that work on the electromagnet principle where a coil… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureProductSlideshowStudy HallAVManufacturerMicrophoneSound ReinforcementStage

  • Tuesday, February 16, 2016
    audio power
    Mike Sokol 02/16 11:59 AM,
    I’ve been a professional audio engineer for 40-plus years and a musician for 10 years more than that, and during that time, I’ve witnessed hundreds of shock events on performance stages, recording studios, and even factory floors. A survey I ran on ProSoundWeb a few years ago revealed that 70 percent of the 3,000 musicians who responded had been shocked at least once on stage – some so severely that they were knocked unconscious. I’ve also witnessed dozens of ground-fault… View this story
    Filed in: AVLive SoundRecordingChurch SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVInterconnectPowerSignalSound ReinforcementStudio

  • Friday, February 12, 2016
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    Teri Hogan 02/12 11:58 AM,
    This article originally appeared on ProSoundWeb in December of 2005. Any time a group of audio professionals congregates to chat, the conversation invariable turns to the topic of labor. That’s when the griping and complaining begins. It seems that less-than-stellar stagehands are an epidemic - at least to hear all of the talk about it. Our sound company has nothing but excellent experiences with stagehands because we chose to do address this issue head on. We do business with several… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureStudy HallProductionCases & AccessoriesCurtains, Pipe & DrapeLightingRiggingStagingAVBusinessEngineerSound ReinforcementStageTechnician

  • Thursday, February 11, 2016
    prosoundweb
    PSW Staff 02/11 02:34 PM,
    ProSoundWeb presents at least two feature articles every day of the working week, meaning that there are 40-plus long-form articles highlighted each and every month. That’s a lot. In fact, so much so that we got to thinking that it would be handy to present a round-up of the most-read articles for those who might have missed at least some of them the first time around. What follows is the top 5 most-read articles on PSW for the month of… View this story
    Filed in: AVLive SoundChurch SoundFeatureBlogAVEducationEngineerSound ReinforcementStudioTechnician

  • Friday, February 05, 2016
    prosoundweb
    Al Keltz 02/05 10:55 AM,
    Election cycles are getting longer and longer, and more campaigns are on the road for extended periods of time while cable and Internet news outlets hunger for content to fill their 24-hour news formats. This has resulted in an increased demand to sound companies and AV rental houses for providing press conference feeds. If you don’t have at least one press mult in inventory and available, you may be missing out on increased revenue opportunities. A Menu For Feeding The… View this story
    Filed in: AVLive SoundFeatureBlogStudy HallAVInterconnectMixerSignalSound Reinforcement

  • Wednesday, February 03, 2016
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    M. Erik Matlock 02/03 01:26 PM,
    Many moons ago, I was approached by a very talented local musician with a common request. “Can you do a project for me? I don’t really have any money, but…” Just fill in that last part with whatever excuse, incentive or promise you feel like pulling from your own experiences. Since these requests arrived so frequently, I developed one of my core philosophies about business. It didn’t matter if it concerned studio projects, live shows or installations; the concept is… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVBusinessEngineerInstallationSound ReinforcementStudioTechnician

  • prosoundweb
    Charlie Hughes 02/03 07:36 AM,
    When measuring loudspeaker systems, the question of phase response often arises. I thought it might be informative to review setting the receive delay within a measurement system so that the displayed phase response is the “correct” one. I have the word correct in quotes above because for a given magnitude response there are an infinite number of equally valid phase responses. This is due in part to what is called propagation delay. This is simply the time of flight of… View this story
    Filed in: AVFeatureBlogStudy HallAVLoudspeakerMeasurementSignalSound Reinforcement



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