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Tech Talk: Building Directional Subwoofer Arrays
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Directional subwoofers are one more tool that can be used by sound system designers in their quest to achieve consistent sound throughout the intended listening area.

When using traditional, more or less omni-directional bass reflex (a.k.a., “vented,” “ported,” or “front-loaded”) subs arranged left and right of a stage, there is a build-up or “power alley” created in the center, where the energy from each source location shows up at the same time, with no phase difference, and sums quite nicely.

Moving left and right off of the center line, this area of addition is followed by alleys of cancellation.

Wavelengths of 40 to 100 Hz are roughly 11 to 23 feet long. At any frequency in this range, as you move away from the center line and change the path length difference between the two sources by half a wavelength (about 5.5 to 11.5 feet) there will be a cancellation, with higher frequency “nulls” encountered first.

To alleviate this there are three methods that have been employed: line arrays of subs, end-fired sub arrays, and cardioid subs, which are sometimes combined.

Line Arrays
Lines of subwoofers are one application of what Harry Olson discussed in the 1957 text Harry F. Olson, Acoustical Engineering, when he described a straight line source; using omni-directional elements, in a line, all reproducing the same signal, with relative close spacing compared to the wavelength, pattern control can be achieved.

Imagine a row of subs is assembled across the front of a stage. If it’s longer than the wavelength of the lowest frequency for which pattern control is desired (25 Hz is about 45 feet) and if the elements are close enough to one another, within two-thirds of a wavelength of the highest frequency produced (100 Hz is about 11 feet, so 2/3 is about 7 feet), cancellation at the ends of the line and addition in front of the array (and behind the array!) will be achieved.

Observed from the audience area, from one end of the line to the other, enough of the energy from each of the elements of the array arrives within +/- 120 degrees, at about the same level and sums.

Observed from the end of the array, enough energy from each of the elements arrives enough out of time but at similar enough level, causing destructive interference and level loss.

The use of a line array (yep, that’s what it is) of subwoofers can avoid horizontal differences in frequency response and deliver more energy to the audience area, while avoiding those nasty side wall reflections at lower frequencies.

Further, maximizing spacing can reduce the level differences from the front to back. In the interest of making sound where the audience is and not making noise where they are not, this is one option.


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